Tag Archives: Wife

Quiet Achievers and Jono’s Wife Is One Of Them

My Son just sent me this this morning from Nepal. Congratulations Kerry. It is wonderful that you have been recognized for your work. You deserve it.

Quiet achievers and record breakers among 2019 Order of Australia winners

2019 OAM winners Wendy Moore (left), Kerry Pryor (center) and Paul Hameister (right) spoke to SBS Nepali. (Supplied)
Nepal continues to feature prominently within the list of achievements of half a dozen 2019 Order of Australia medal winners, with at least one recognised solely for their work in the Himalayan nation.

Paul Hameister – the first Australian to complete the Seven Summits and Polar Hat-trick, photographer Kerry Pryor, and polymer clay artist Wendy Moore have been awarded the 2019 Order of Australia medal by the outgoing Governor-General of Australia, Sir Peter Cosgrove.

They are among the 993 recipients in the general division of this year’s Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Australia’s former ambassador to Nepal, Crispin Conroy, nursing educator Professor Kerry Anne Reid–Searl, and Rotarian Colin Harding have also been included in the list.

The Quiet Achiever

Wendy Moore from the Australian Capital Territory maybe one such person known only to people she is helping.

The Ainslie resident has been awarded the Order of Australia medal for her service to the international community of Nepal.

The Polymer clay artist is the founder and director at Friends of Samunnat, an organization in eastern Nepali district of Jhapa, that supports female victims of violence in the country.

Since its inception in 2006, she has been providing local women with training and support to make and sell polymer jewellery.

“Because you can’t get polymer in Nepal, initially Friends of Samunnat were buying the clay for women to make the jewellery – and we help them distribute,” says Moore.

Those pieces of jewellery are sold in Australia and the funds raised from the sales help provide legal, accommodation, education, and health support for Nepali women,” she told SBS Nepali.

Wendy Moore OAM with Nepali women Sammunat
Wendy Moore OAM(1st right) at Sammunat’s office in Nepal.

Ms Moore has previously lived in Nepal for four years and now visits the country twice a year.

“I think I’ve had more than 40 trips to Nepal and that feeling I had the first time I visited the country in 1975 as a teenager, hasn’t left.

“It feels like one of my homes,” she says.

“My husband and I had felt we wanted to do some work over there in some capacity- when our kids left home. He got a job at BP Koirala hospital in Dharan. I had been working for many years in brain injury and I wanted to focus on arts – so at that stage, I was hoping that my art and my desire to work in Nepal would match.”

But for Wendy Moore, it’s not just about what she has given but what she has learnt from her experience in Nepal.

She thinks her work with Samunnat Nepal has provided meaning to her and her husband’s life.

Off the beaten track

Kerry Pryor is another Australian who had never thought about being included in the Order of Australia award.

The award-winning Melbourne photographer is currently in Nepal and described what she thought when she first found out about the recognition.

“I do get a lot of spams so I did have to read the email a few times to make sure,” Pryor told SBS Nepali.

“It wasn’t on my radar so it is an honour to be acknowledged,” she said.

Kerry Pryor OAM (2nd from left) in Nepal.
Kerry Pryor OAM (2nd from left) in Nepal.

Pryor’s first visit to Nepal was very different to many Australians who have visited the country.

In April 2015, when she was scheduled to travel to Kathmandu, a devastating earthquake rocked the country killing more than 8,000 people.

Two weeks later, in May, another quake took the lives of more than 1,900 people.

“The group I was meant to be meeting had a crisis to deal with after the first earthquake on April 25, so my trip got delayed.”

A month later, she arrived in the southern Nepali city of Birgunj.

Her visit to the city focused on seeing some of the local programs run by an Australian registered charity, called Beyond the Orphanage.

The group, she says, helps children rescued from child traffickers or housed at illegal orphanages.

Ms Pryor has been working as a Child Sponsorship Coordinator and Photographer for Beyond the Orphanage since 2011.

Along with Nepal, the organization also works in Kenya.

Kerry Pryor’s volunteer photography began about ten years ago when she was working for Eyes for Africa charitable foundation.

Among her roles in Nepal, she has to coordinate correspondence between sponsors and the children through the orphanage every six months.

Pryor says she likes to show hope through her photography.

“The kids are really resilient… I want to show those kids getting stronger.”

But she is also aware of the issues surrounding volunteer tourism or “voluntourism” where tourists can do more harm than good for the locals.

“It’s something we’re becoming more aware of. It can be difficult to regulate the world over. With the photography I do, I am very conscious of that – who I’m doing the photography for and do my due diligence.”

Like daughter, like father

Record making is turning into a family affair for another Order of Australia medal winner this year.

Mountaineer and entrepreneur Paul Hameister is another Victorian to be included in the 2019 Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

He has been recognized for his service to exploration and to business.

In 2018, he became the first Australian to successfully scale the seven tallest mountains in seven continents and complete the Polar hat trick by skiing through the South Pole, the North Pole and Greenland.

Paul Hameister OAM’s Everest summit in 2011.

Paul’s 17-year-old daughter Jade has also set her own world record by becoming the youngest person to ski through Greenland and the north and south poles.

He accompanied his daughter for the polar adventure.

Among Paul Hameister’s key achievements, Nepal has occupied a prominent space.

He reached the top of Mount Everest in 2011 and founded a charity, the same year, called Sunrise Children’s Association the same year to support children in Nepal.

“When I was privileged enough to reach the top of Everest, I felt very deep debt gratitude to the people of Nepal. Not just due to my experience there but I do not think there are many westerners who would be able to do that without the help of local people,” he says.

“The program I’ve been involved with through sunrise is the educational scholarship program where, rather than support the orphanages, they also run a program to try and stop children being abandoned into orphanages.”

Paul Hameister OAM with his daughter Jade, also an award winning adventurer and a record holder for Polar hattrick.

Paul Hameister OAM with his daughter Jade, also an award winning adventurer and a record holder for Polar hattrick.

In 2013, the Nepalese Association of Victoria recognized his work in Nepal with an excellence award.

Unlike Kerry Pryor, Mr Hameister’s first visit to Nepal was for trekking and white water rafting when he was 20-years-old.

He has also conducted research into the impact of tourism on developing countries and that has provided him with some insights on Nepal.

Two years after summiting Mount Everest in 2011, Paul brought his wife and two kids and trekked to the base camp of the world’s tallest mountain.

Jade, his daughter was 12 and his son was 10 years old.

With the current debate surrounding the number of mountaineers on Everest this season, Paul Hamister doesn’t think the number of climbers attempting to summit the mountain has changed significantly over the last decade.

“What has changed is the accuracy of weather forecasting,” he says.

The improvement in weather forecasting means people wanting to utilize the limited summit days available will increase and this he says can lead to the situation where people are seen queuing on the mountain.

“The teams at base camp see the forecast and decide what day to summit. But there’s no coordination between the teams at basecamp to try and spread themselves across various days. Each season there are days when you’re able to take photos like that,” says Hamister referring to the viral image of mountaineers in a long line.

According to him, the solution to such a situation is about coordination rather than reducing the number of permits issued for mountaineers.

Paul Hameister just below the summit of Everest 11 May 2011

Paul Hameister OAM just below the summit of Everest 11 May 2011.

With numerous mountaineering and business achievements under his name, Hameister wants to change his approach to life. He doesn’t shy away from accepting that his early days in expedition and business were driven by ego.

Now, he says, it’s about giving back and being less focused on goals.

“Acknowledging and recognizing what I gained from those expeditions – which are a deep appreciation of nature and the environment and its importance.”

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Now This Is Funny🤣

Study the picture first and then read the story.

This happened to an Englishman in France who was totally drunk. The French policeman stops his car and asks the gentleman if he has been drinking. With great difficulty, the Englishman admits that he has been drinking all day, that his daughter got married in the morning to a French man, and that he drank champagne and a few bottles of wine at the reception and quite a few glasses of single malt thereafter.

Quite upset, the policeman proceeds to alcotest (breath test) him and asks the Englishman if he knows under French Law why he is going to be arrested.

The Englishman answers with humor. No sir, I do not! But while we’re asking questions, do you know that this is a British car and my wife is driving … On the other side.

🤣😂🤣

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Urgent Prayer For Our President

Look, love him or hate him you have to admit that the assaults on  President Trump are mean and vicious. I believe the American people to be better than this. This viciousness is separating families, our ability to be reasonable and to recognize success and how this great country of USA has benefited from many changes that have been made. More Jobs, less tax for most and more money in the pockets of many Americans. This whole vindictiveness is ridiculous. I does not matter wether you are left or right and I am sure there will be many of you that will scorn what I have to say. I don’t care. I hate this mean spiritness of the people, not considering how destructive it is on the Presidents young son and his wife and the rest of his family. It is sick. If you let this hatred continue everyone will suffer in the end.

It needs to stop.

Prayers for the President and the USA is needed. I believe this man has got it right.

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Something to make you Smile on a Friday

Tennessee Striptease

Cletus is passing by Billy Bob ‘s hay barn one day when, through a gap in the door, he sees Billy Bob doing a slow and sensual striptease in front of an old John Deere tractor.

Buttocks clenched, he performs a slow pirouette, and gently slides off first the right strap of his overalls, followed by the left. He then hunches his shoulders forward and in a classic striptease move, lets his overalls fall down to his hips, revealing a torn and frayed plaid shirt.

Then, grabbing both sides of his shirt, he rips it apart to reveal his stained T-shirt underneath. With a final flourish, he tears the T-shirt from his body, and hurls his baseball cap onto a pile of hay.

Having seen enough, Cletus rushes in and says, “What the world are ya doing, Billy Bob ?”

“Good grief, Cletus, ya scared the bejeebers out of me,” says an obviously embarrassed Billy Bob, “But me ‘n the wife been havin’ trouble lately in the bedroom d’partment, and the therapist suggested I do something sexy to a tractor.”

Don’t make me come splain this to you! Read the last line again, slowly.

🤣🤣

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Something to Make You Smile On A Monday

Bert feared his wife Peg wasn’t hearing as well as she used to and he thought she might need a hearing aid.

Not quite sure how to approach her, he called the family doctor to discuss the problem.

The doctor told him there is a simple informal test the husband could perform to give the doctor a better idea about her hearing loss.

“Here’s what you do,” said the doctor, “stand about 40 feet away from her, and in a normal conversational speaking tone see if she hears you. If not, go to 30 feet, then 20 feet, and so on until you get a response.”

That evening, the wife is in the kitchen cooking dinner, and he was in the den. He says to himself, “I’m about 40 feet away, let’s see what happens.” Then in a normal tone he asks, “Honey, what’s for dinner?”

No response.

So the husband moves closer to the kitchen, about 30 feet from his wife and repeats, “Peg, what’s for dinner?”

Still no response.

Next he moves into the dining room where he is about 20 feet from his wife and asks, “Honey, what’s for dinner?”

Again, he gets no response.

So, he walks up to the kitchen door, about 10 feet away. “Honey, what’s for dinner?”

Again there is no response.

So he walks right up behind her. “Peg, what’s for dinner?”

(I just love this!)

“Dammit, Bert, for the FIFTH time, CHICKEN!”

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

LOL for Today

com_samsung_android_email_attachmentprovider_1_1099_raw_1484552108975

Ron Chester, 89 years of age, was stopped by the police around 2 am
and was asked where he was going at that time of night.

Ron replied, “I’m on my way to a lecture about alcohol abuse and the effects it has on
the human body, as well as smoking and staying out late.”

The officer asked, “Really? Who’s giving that lecture at this time of night?”

Ron replied, “That would be my wife.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Sarcasm At Its Best – Letter To A Budget Airline in Australia

I thought this was priceless

 

766e15c6808ff04b00b0e52325aca674

Budget airlines seem to have a knack for copping flack from their passengers — but you’ve never seen a complaint quite like this before.

Passenger, Jay Mancuso from South Australia, flew low-cost carrier, Jetstar, back to Australia from Bali recently and contacted the airline with a rather unusual gripe. Here’s his hilarious letter to Jetstar on Facebook and their just as witty response.

Dear Mr & Mrs Jetstar.

Hello, my name is Jay, and you guys gave me and my beautiful new wife a lift to Bali the other week to get married. Twas a lovely occasion and I believe you also gave about 60ish of our guests a lift also. Apart from the cramped seats, all went very well.

Now, I have read with interest several attacks on budget airlines, such as yourself, in recent years. Today I’d like to become one of these people (insert eye roll here).

On Friday evening at Denpasar international airport, my wife (still getting used to that) and I checked in at your Jetstar desk. Tired and grumpy (no one likes leaving holidays) we walked through the immigration stuff and wasn’t till we were “on the other side” we noticed that we were incorrectly allocated our seats. Prior to travel, I booked and paid for extra legroom, being a big fella, in seats 1a and 1b. Alas, we were allocated 15c and 15b. What?! That’s outrageous, I thought. I continued to the gate and talked to a lovely lady there who said the seats were double booked. But they changed our seats to 2a & 2b. Oh well, not much I can do from here.

Disgruntled as we were, we walked onto the plane and a wonderful lady, Abbey, flight manager, asked us why we had our tickets changed. I explained. Abbey then moved us to front row opposite and apologised profusely.

BUT! It didn’t stop there. Abbey had the nerve to tell us that she was incredibly embarrassed about our mix up, gave us both a Jetstar comfort pack (love the toothbrush) and a warm little blanket for the journey. Wow, of all the insolence. Then, THEN just after take off, would you believe she continued her torrent of niceness, and told us to select a beverage and some food FREE of charge!!!!!

Landing in Adelaide at 6:00am she then still gave us a huge friendly smile and apologised once again.

This is not the behaviour one expects when travelling with a low cost carrier and it must stop! I expect far less of your staff and I think Abbey needs a good talking to.

So, in finishing. To dear Abbey, flight manager on board flight JQ128 ex DPS -ADL on Friday night the 25th November 2016, I salute you. Your customer service and attention to detail was exemplary. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts, you turned our frowns upside down. Jetstar, give this girl a sticker of excellence. It’s conduct like this that ensure we will be flying Jetstar again. (But can we please have a Dreamliner plane for the Adelaide to DPS run?)

Yours in good fun.

Jay Mancuso

 

Jetstar penned this reply:

Hi Jay,

Thank you for your post and congratulations to you and your new Mrs!

I’m sorry to hear of the issues with your seating, but so glad Abbey could turn it around for you and make sure you had an awesome flight. We go to great lengths to try and provide passengers with excellent customer service so it’s always helpful when a customer takes the time to tell us exactly what we’re getting right.

 

It’s also really rewarding for our team to have their work recognised in such a thoughtful way. I’ve passed your comments on to Abbey and her managers and I know they’ll really appreciate your thanks.

I’m sorry if I’m just pushing it too far, but I’ve also requested for a refund to be processed back to your credit card for the cost of the extra leg room seating, just as a further gesture of goodwill (how annoying can we be?). We’ll process this within 15 business days.

Thanks again for your great post and all the best to you and your new wife. We hope to see you both on board again soon :)

Cheers — Mrs Jetstar (Emma)

 

Source: Escape.com.au

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles