Tag Archives: water

Is Sparkling Water Good For you?

 

The sale of Sparking water in the USA has risen 42% since 2011 according to statistics done in 2016. Sparkling water can be natural or man-made. Of course Natural is the better alternative, like sparkling mineral water which is naturally carbonated and contains minerals and straight from the source. Not all Sparkling mineral water is naturally sparkling so some companies add Carbon dioxide to give it bubbles.

Seltzer Water vs. Club Soda – Choose neither – sparkling water you absolutely want to stay away from is one that contains artificial flavors, colors and/or additives. That is those healthy looking mineral drinks like Orange, lime, grapefruit etc.
Club soda contains sodium, but seltzer is typically sodium-free. If you have a health problem with salt the Club Soda is not the one for you.

Natural Sparkling Water Benefits

 

Doctors recommend  non-sparkling (Kangen of course in my opinion ) water over sparkling, but sparkling water definitely wins over high-sugar soda and juices. Sparkling water  lowers the pH of water, making it more acidic, and one of the things that causes dental erosion.

pH of flavored sparkling waters is concerning.  Carbonating of water lowers its pH to around a 5.

This I find rather interesting. Researchers have found that the sensation we experience when we drink a carbonated beverage like sparkling water is due to a reaction that occurs inside our mouths that changes carbon dioxide bubbles into irritating carbonic acid. So that exhilarating “bite” of carbonation is actually chemical rather than physical.

Basically the end the recommendation is opting for regular water with ph of 8 – 9.5 the vast majority of the time or using natural flavors like lemon, cucumber or waterelon. Those natural infusions also helps to create a higher pH level.

Source

 

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What would happen if you did not drink enough water 💦

This is actually very interesting and should be watched by all. Often we mistake the feeling of  being thirsty for hunger feelings. Usually not so.

Enjoy the knowledge it may save your life. 

Kangen Water the best for a healthy quest

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Wise Water Words – 💦

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August 5, 2018 · 7:02 PM

Do You Know What Is In Your Local Water Supply – Find out

 

This Database is only for America but I will see if I can find something similar in Australia. It is a little scary and if you have a look at some of the analysis of the water you are drinking you may start thinking about a good water drinking machine.

I am not saying go out and buy a Kangen water machine, although if you do you will be buying the best and also it may save your life especially when you see what you are drinking straight from the tap and of course if you have health problems.

I clicked on the area where I live in Houston and this was the result: – Just saying if someone is fighting Cancer they may need to look at the water they are drinking before looking at anything else for a cure or rather to avoid drinking their local supply of Tap water.

  • Arsenic  Cancer

  • Bromodichloromethane

    cancer


  • Chlorite

    change in blood chemistry


  • Chloroform

    cancer


  • Chromium (hexavalent)

    cancer


  • Dichloroacetic acid

    cancer


  • Radiological contaminants

    cancer


  • Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs)

    cancer


  • Trichloroacetic acid

    cancer


Now that is rather frightening. 

TAP WATER – LEARN WHAT’S IN IT

Tap water suppliers publish their water quality tests. The vast majority of bottled water companies don’t. Read your annual tap water quality report. Look up your city’s water in EWG’s National Tap Water Database.

Since 2010, water utilities’ testing has found pollutants in Americans’ tap water, according to an EWG drinking water quality analysis of 30 million state water records.

If you are interested in finding out what is in the tap water in your area just go to EWG tap Water Database.

Put in your Zip Code and take a look.

“If you don’t do different nothing will change”

 

 

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Love Your Body – Love The Water You Drink❤️💦

Well not all waters are the same. Love your body, love the water you drink. May sound a bit corny but it matters. I have been away from my Kangen water machine for two weeks now and I do notice the difference. The Melbourne water tastes ok but I a struggling with consuming the right quantity as I miss the Texture and taste of The Kangen water. Truly not just a sales pitch. . Did not help my Maroon Football team win last night here in Melbourne though. Maybe they should be like the prominent NRL players in USA who drink Kangen water

More info on this

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A Healthy Gut Will Boost Your Immunity 💦

This is a very interesting subject. Other than drinking health beneficial water like Kangen water, The food we consume is essential to a healthy life and a healthy gut. The two go hand in hand.

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How To Grow Garlic


Find out when to plant garlic in your region. In general, the best times for planting are mid-autumn or early spring.
Garlic grows well in a wide range of climates. It does less well in areas of high heat or humidity, or where there is a lot of rainfall.


Choose a planting spot and prepare the soil. Garlic needs a lot of full sun, but it might tolerate partial shade provided it’s not for very long during the day or growing season. The soil must be well dug over and crumbly. Sandy loam is best.
Before adding nutrients to your soil, you should know what is already there. If you haven’t done a soil test, contact your local county extension office for a soil sampling kit.[1]
Ensure that the soil has good drainage. Clay-based soils are not good for planting garlic.
Use compost and manure to add nutrients to the soil before planting the garlic.

Source fresh garlic. Garlic is grown by planting the cloves — called seeds for our purposes — so to get started all you need to do is buy fresh garlic. Choose garlic from a store, or even better, a farm stand or the local farmers market. It’s very important that the garlic bulbs chosen are fresh and of high quality. If you can, choose organic garlic so that you avoid garlic that has been sprayed with chemicals.
Choose fresh garlic bulbs with large cloves. Avoid garlic that has become soft.
Each clove will sprout into a garlic plant, so keep that in mind when you’re figuring out how many heads to buy.
If you have some garlic at home that has sprouted, that’s great to use.
Nurseries also offer garlic bulbs for planting. Visit a nursery if you want to get a specific variety or to get advice on local conditions for garlic.
Mail-order catalogs and online seed stores offer many types of garlic and will include specific planting instructions for the type of seed you buy.

Break the cloves from a fresh garlic head. Be careful not to damage the cloves at their base, where they attach to the garlic plate. If the base is damaged, the garlic will not grow.
Plant the larger cloves. The smaller cloves take up just as much space in the planting bed, but they produce much smaller bulbs.

Push each clove into the soil. Point the tips upward and plant the cloves about 2 inches (5cm) deep.
The cloves should be spaced about 8 inches (20cm) apart for best growing conditions.


Cover the planted cloves with mulch. Suitable toppings include hay, dry leaves, straw, compost, well rotted manure, or well rotted grass clippings.

Fertilize the cloves or top-dress with compost. The planted garlic needs a complete fertilizer at the time of planting.
Fertilize again in the spring if you are planting your garlic in the fall, or in the fall if you’re planting it in the spring.

Water the plants when necessary. Newly planted garlic needs to be kept moist to help the roots to develop. Don’t overdo the water, however, as garlic does not grow well, or may even rot, if sodden during cold months.
Water deeply once a week if rain has not fallen. Watering garlic is not necessary unless there is a drought, in which case water sparingly, as garlic hates wet soil.
Reduce the watering gradually as the season warms up. The garlic needs a hot, dry summer to allow the bulbs to mature.

Take care of pests. Insects, mice, and other creatures may come to eat the garlic or make a nest among the plants. Beware the following pests:
Aphids seem to enjoy garlic leaves, and the flower buds. They’re easy to get rid of — simply rub your fingers over them and squash them or apply a pesticide.
Many people tend to plant garlic underneath roses to deter aphids; the roses benefit from the aphids being drawn away.
Mice and other small creatures sometimes nest in mulch. If you have a problem with mice in your area, consider using plastic mulch or landscaping fabric.

Eat some scapes. As the garlic plants begin to grow, long green stalks called scapes will emerge. Pull off a few scapes and eat them if you wish. The best part of the scape is the young, tender shoot.
This may damage the garlic bulbs themselves, so don’t do it to every plant.
Use gloves when pulling off scapes; otherwise your hands will smell of garlic for days.

Note the signs of readiness for harvesting. Garlic bulbs are ready to be harvested when you can feel the individual cloves in the bulb, and the leaves turn yellow or brown.
Once the scapes start to dry, it is important to harvest the garlic or the head will “shatter” and divide into the individual cloves.
Begin harvesting at the end of the summer. Harvesting can continue well into autumn in most places.
Some warm climates may enable earlier harvesting of garlic.

Loosen the area around each bulb with a shovel or garden fork. Pull the bulbs out of the ground. If using a fork, be careful not to stab the bulbs underground.
Be careful with the digging process, since garlic tends to bruise easily.
The plants should be kept complete and unwashed, and hung up to “cure” for two weeks. The ideal temperature is 80°F (26.7°C) for curing. Once cured, the outer flaky layers of the bulb can be brushed off, leaving clean skin below. Trim the tops and the roots, and store in a cool, dry place.
Washing garlic will prolong the curing process and potentially cause it to rot. Also, if the garlic is not cured, it will rot quickly in the pantry.

Store garlic in a cool, dry place in your home. Dried bulbs can be kept in a garlic keeper (usually made from pottery), and individual cloves can be pulled off as needed.

 

Make a garlic plait or braid. The dried leaves can be kept back and plaited or braided into a strand, from which you can hang the garlic bulbs in your pantry or kitchen. This is both decorative and useful.

To Learn more got to Wikihow.com a great source of information

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