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How To Grow Garlic


Find out when to plant garlic in your region. In general, the best times for planting are mid-autumn or early spring.
Garlic grows well in a wide range of climates. It does less well in areas of high heat or humidity, or where there is a lot of rainfall.


Choose a planting spot and prepare the soil. Garlic needs a lot of full sun, but it might tolerate partial shade provided it’s not for very long during the day or growing season. The soil must be well dug over and crumbly. Sandy loam is best.
Before adding nutrients to your soil, you should know what is already there. If you haven’t done a soil test, contact your local county extension office for a soil sampling kit.[1]
Ensure that the soil has good drainage. Clay-based soils are not good for planting garlic.
Use compost and manure to add nutrients to the soil before planting the garlic.

Source fresh garlic. Garlic is grown by planting the cloves — called seeds for our purposes — so to get started all you need to do is buy fresh garlic. Choose garlic from a store, or even better, a farm stand or the local farmers market. It’s very important that the garlic bulbs chosen are fresh and of high quality. If you can, choose organic garlic so that you avoid garlic that has been sprayed with chemicals.
Choose fresh garlic bulbs with large cloves. Avoid garlic that has become soft.
Each clove will sprout into a garlic plant, so keep that in mind when you’re figuring out how many heads to buy.
If you have some garlic at home that has sprouted, that’s great to use.
Nurseries also offer garlic bulbs for planting. Visit a nursery if you want to get a specific variety or to get advice on local conditions for garlic.
Mail-order catalogs and online seed stores offer many types of garlic and will include specific planting instructions for the type of seed you buy.

Break the cloves from a fresh garlic head. Be careful not to damage the cloves at their base, where they attach to the garlic plate. If the base is damaged, the garlic will not grow.
Plant the larger cloves. The smaller cloves take up just as much space in the planting bed, but they produce much smaller bulbs.

Push each clove into the soil. Point the tips upward and plant the cloves about 2 inches (5cm) deep.
The cloves should be spaced about 8 inches (20cm) apart for best growing conditions.


Cover the planted cloves with mulch. Suitable toppings include hay, dry leaves, straw, compost, well rotted manure, or well rotted grass clippings.

Fertilize the cloves or top-dress with compost. The planted garlic needs a complete fertilizer at the time of planting.
Fertilize again in the spring if you are planting your garlic in the fall, or in the fall if you’re planting it in the spring.

Water the plants when necessary. Newly planted garlic needs to be kept moist to help the roots to develop. Don’t overdo the water, however, as garlic does not grow well, or may even rot, if sodden during cold months.
Water deeply once a week if rain has not fallen. Watering garlic is not necessary unless there is a drought, in which case water sparingly, as garlic hates wet soil.
Reduce the watering gradually as the season warms up. The garlic needs a hot, dry summer to allow the bulbs to mature.

Take care of pests. Insects, mice, and other creatures may come to eat the garlic or make a nest among the plants. Beware the following pests:
Aphids seem to enjoy garlic leaves, and the flower buds. They’re easy to get rid of — simply rub your fingers over them and squash them or apply a pesticide.
Many people tend to plant garlic underneath roses to deter aphids; the roses benefit from the aphids being drawn away.
Mice and other small creatures sometimes nest in mulch. If you have a problem with mice in your area, consider using plastic mulch or landscaping fabric.

Eat some scapes. As the garlic plants begin to grow, long green stalks called scapes will emerge. Pull off a few scapes and eat them if you wish. The best part of the scape is the young, tender shoot.
This may damage the garlic bulbs themselves, so don’t do it to every plant.
Use gloves when pulling off scapes; otherwise your hands will smell of garlic for days.

Note the signs of readiness for harvesting. Garlic bulbs are ready to be harvested when you can feel the individual cloves in the bulb, and the leaves turn yellow or brown.
Once the scapes start to dry, it is important to harvest the garlic or the head will “shatter” and divide into the individual cloves.
Begin harvesting at the end of the summer. Harvesting can continue well into autumn in most places.
Some warm climates may enable earlier harvesting of garlic.

Loosen the area around each bulb with a shovel or garden fork. Pull the bulbs out of the ground. If using a fork, be careful not to stab the bulbs underground.
Be careful with the digging process, since garlic tends to bruise easily.
The plants should be kept complete and unwashed, and hung up to “cure” for two weeks. The ideal temperature is 80°F (26.7°C) for curing. Once cured, the outer flaky layers of the bulb can be brushed off, leaving clean skin below. Trim the tops and the roots, and store in a cool, dry place.
Washing garlic will prolong the curing process and potentially cause it to rot. Also, if the garlic is not cured, it will rot quickly in the pantry.

Store garlic in a cool, dry place in your home. Dried bulbs can be kept in a garlic keeper (usually made from pottery), and individual cloves can be pulled off as needed.

 

Make a garlic plait or braid. The dried leaves can be kept back and plaited or braided into a strand, from which you can hang the garlic bulbs in your pantry or kitchen. This is both decorative and useful.

To Learn more got to Wikihow.com a great source of information

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Did You Know – 12/14/2015

1. Hot buttered rum 420 calories

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INGREDIENTS

  • 4 ounces (1 stick) room-temperature unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup packed dark-brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 ounces dark rum
  • 3/4 cups boiling water
  • Squeeze of Fresh orange juice

DIRECTIONS

  1. Beat butter, sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg with a mixer on medium speed until combined, about 1 minute.

  2. Combine 2 tablespoons spiced butter with 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) dark rum in each of 4 heatproof glasses. Pour 3/4 cup boiling water over each, and stir. Top each with a squeeze of fresh orange juice.

  2.  Eggnog before the brandy – 240 calories

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Ingredients
4 egg yolks
1/3 cup sugar, plus 1 tablespoon
1 pint whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
3 ounces bourbon
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
4 egg whites*
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Directions
Watch how to make this recipe.
In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Add the milk, cream, bourbon and nutmeg and stir to combine.

Place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat to soft peaks. With the mixer still running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form.

Whisk the egg whites into the mixture. Chill and serve.

Cook’s Note: For cooked eggnog, follow procedure below.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Set aside.

In a medium saucepan, over high heat, combine the milk, heavy cream and nutmeg and bring just to a boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and gradually temper the hot mixture into the egg and sugar mixture. Then return everything to the pot and cook until the mixture reaches 160 degrees F. Remove from the heat, stir in the bourbon, pour into a medium mixing bowl, and set in the refrigerator to chill.

In a medium mixing bowl, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. With the mixer running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Whisk the egg whites into the chilled mixture.

CONTAINS RAW EGGS: The Food Network Kitchen suggest caution in consuming raw and lightly cooked eggs due to the slight risk of salmonella or other food-borne illness. To reduce this risk, we recommend you use only fresh, properly refrigerated, clean grade A or AA eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the shell. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served, use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method.
Recipe courtesy of Alton Brown, 2005

3.  One glass of Champagne – 40z – 85 calores

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Easy no recipe and I guess champagne wins on the calorie count.

 

5.  More Did You Knows and an important one.

onlinePrivacy

5 Ways to Protect Your Digital Privacy 
By Mark Nestmann

Revelations about clandestine data collection are old news now. Government agencies and thousands of commercial entities are able to access our personal information via the internet and by mining public databases. 

Data that you thought was removed and files you thought you deleted can still be recovered from your personal computer. And all computers are vulnerable to this. 

But luckily there are steps we can take to maintain some level of privacy in a non-private world. You can mask your digital presence. It doesn’t cost much, and it’s fairly easy even for the tech-unsavvy amongst us.

Here are some simple and effective ways to protect your digital privacy. 

  1. Secure your router. If you have a high-speed internet connection in your home, it probably connects to the internet through a device called a router. Routers are usually installed with a default password. Should someone take over your router, it’s relatively easy to change the settings to point to a computer controlled by that person. From that point forward, everything you do online can be monitored. So change the password on your router to one that can’t easily be guessed. 
  1. Configure your internet browser for privacy. As you surf the Web, you pick up a trail of temporary files that your browser stores, sometimes indefinitely. To minimize your digital trail, use the private browsing mode of your internet browser. This turns off all tracking features including browsing history, auto-complete, form and search bar entries, passwords, and download list entries. In addition, no cookies or web cache files are stored.
  1. Use a non-U.S. webmail provider. Webmail—services like Yahoo mail and Gmail—is extremely convenient. You can access your emails from anywhere and a virtually unlimited number of messages for free. But with U.S.-based webmail services, you can kiss your privacy goodbye. The police can legally read older emails (anything more than 180 days old) and Gmail, Yahoo, and other domestic email providers receive tens of thousands of subpoenas from police and other government agencies.

    To protect yourself, use a non-U.S. email service that takes privacy and security seriously. The one we use at The Nestmann Group is Century Media. This company offers end-to-end encrypted email and all its servers are based in Switzerland. That means your stored emails are secure from U.S. subpoenas, court orders, and snoops.
  1. Encrypt your emails, messages, and files. With an encryption program, no one but you and your intended recipient can read your email messages, text messages, and instant messages. The technology scrambles the message and a decryption key is needed to read the message. Some encryption programs available now make it nearly impossible to decipher your messages, even by the supercomputers used by the NSA.
  1. Encrypt your cloud storage. Storing data online, whether it’s email messages or the secret formula to Coca-Cola “in the cloud” is now routine. But like everything else, if you’re dealing with a U.S. company, it’s not necessarily private or secure. Take U.S.-based Dropbox, for example. Not only is Dropbox subject to extremely loose U.S. privacy laws, but researchers discovered that private Dropbox files you share can be indexed by search engines, making it possible for anyone who can find the link to open it.

    One way to protect yourself is to upload only encrypted files to Dropbox. Otherwise, consider one of the many Dropbox alternatives such as Tresorit.

 Source Interesting Website –  Mark Nestmann

 

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Did You Know – 10/12/2015

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1. There are 10 times more bacteria cells in your body than human cells

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2. Your brain is 60% fat runs on 25 watts but can actually have 300 years worth of storage and enough to power a light bulb .
Source

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3. Consuming coffee daily can drastically decrease your chances of developing liver cancer and disease
Italian researcher Dr. Carlo La Vecchia, Milan’s Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri conducted a study that shows consuming at least one cup of coffee daily can lower the risk of liver cancer by 40%! Additionally, some results showed that if you drink three cups a day, the risks reduce by more than 50%. According to a study at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, coffee consumption can lower the incidence of cirrhosis of the liver for alcohol drinkers by 22%. Research also showed that drinking more than two cups of coffee daily reduce the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%.

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4. Whistle While You Work: Music can Enhance Your Work Performance?

Listening to music during work is frowned upon However, music can actually help your work performance?
The researchers found that listening did improve task performance on simple tasks, but not on complex tasks (Oldham 1995). Nonetheless, for the employees that listened to music, the music made them more relaxed and in a better mood at work. The researchers also found that the employees that listened to music were less likely to quit (Oldham 1995).

It seems carefully tailoring the music you listen to while studying, based on the subject matter and your mood, can help keep you focused — so long as you stay away from lyrics while doing language-based work.
Source

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5. People who are easily distracted tend to be more intelligent.

People who often find their mind wandering have too much brain. Specifically, the easily distracted tended to have more grey matter. So says Ryota Kanai and his colleagues at University College London, who found larger than average volumes of grey matter in certain brain regions in those whose attention is readily diverted.
Source

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6. Why we fear the things we do

The amygdala is probably one of the smallest structures in the human brain. It’s just a tiny mass of neurons (Bailey, 2014). It’d be easy to dismiss it, but you shouldn’t-and here’s why. The amygdala has a lot on its plate. For one, it controls the secretion of hormones that are responsible for fear and aggression (Bailey, 2014). It also interacts with the hippocampus to deal with your memory (Bailey, 2014). It’s no wonder, then, that the amygdala is what is responsible for controlling your phobias.
Is it something innately born, the answer is probably not. The research conducted shows that a genetic link is highly unlikely (Goode, 2015). It’s much more likely that phobias are the product of our environment or experiences.
Source

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Did You Know – 06/23/2014

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1. To sharpen scissors, simply cut through sandpaper.

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2. A very simple solution to get rid of furniture scratches!

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3. Use rubber bands to help open a jar easily: place one around the jar
lid and another around the middle of the glass. The rubber provides
friction to prevent your hands from slipping.

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4. To prevent your eyes watering while chopping onions, wipe the chopping
board with white vinegar (which won’t affect the taste of the onions)

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5. Store bed sheets inside their pillowcases for easy storage and access

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6. Drop a couple of denture cleaning tablets into the
toilet bowl at night to clean off stubborn stains.
But put the Dentures in a convenient glass near by..

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And More Clever Tips! – These Are Good

Use wire to make a space to store gift wrap rolls against the ceiling, rather than cluttering up the floor.

This one I love because I am always losing jewelry on the floor which ends up in the vacuum cleaner.

Find tiny lost items like earrings by putting a stocking over the vacuum hose.

Make an instant cupcake carrier by cutting crosses into a box lid.

For those who can’t stand the scrunching and bunching: how to perfectly fold a fitted sheet.

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