Tag Archives: LOSS

Fine Diagram on How Kangen Water Helps Weight Loss💦

I can’t express more the advantages of drinking Kangen water to help lose weight. My husband has lost 60lbs in 6 months and drinks half his body weight in oz of Kangen water per day. Since he increased his intake of Kangen water to half his body weight he lost 30lbs in 3 months. Enjoys coffee for the taste of the good quality and not the need to get him going for the day. I have lost weight not sure how much as I never get on scales. But friends and clothes tell me so.  ❤️ my friends.
This diagram below is a good example of how it works.

“If you don’t do different nothing will change”

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Did You Know – 10/16/2017

1. These new developments in the aid of hearing – a.) a new device that will be powered by our phones called “Earlens”
“Earlens” uses a laserlike light signals to stimulate the eardrum directly and offers broad frequency fr those who haven’t had success with traditional hearing aids.
b.) Treatments to prevent “hidden Hear loss” a newly discovered condition in which people can pass a hearing test but don’t hear well in noisy environments.
c.) In five to ten years from now they are getting much closer to regenerating hearing with gene therapy. Using a harmless virus, they can deliver a gene to the inner ear in mice and guinea pigs and stimulate the hair cells to regrow and regenerate hearing. They are also testing the delivery of nerve growth factors to reconnect the inner ear cells to the synapse, which could reverse hearing loss
Source – Bradly Welling, MD chief of Otolaryngology Massachusetts Eye and Ear, and Massachusetts General Hospital

 

2. That the Human body is 70% – 75% water. Some studies show 70% of pre school children drink no water at all during the day.  Some have a diminished thirst mechanism and mistake it for hunger, feeding their thirst with food.

Here is a chart of the recommended consumption of water according to your weight.


Source: Health and Wellness

3. Reasearch shows that the more grateful you are, the less anxious you tend to be.

Make a conscious effort to intentionally focus on things you are grateful or by writing them down – and the more specific you can be the better.
A pressure point for easing anxiety is Pericardium 6 – which is in the middle of the inside forearm, two and a half fingers with away from the wrist. Gently press and knead the area for two minutes, take some nice deep breaths and feel a sense of calm wash over you.
Source – Charmaine, Yabsley – Nature and Health magazine

4. It takes six months to build a Rolls Royce…and 13 hours to build a Toyota.
source

 

5. Your body is younger than you. No matter how old you are most of your body is less than 10 years old, because your cells are always recycling themselves. The epidermis recycles every 2-4 weeks, red blood cells are replaced every 4 months and your skeleton turns over every 10 years

source

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How to Prevent Muscle Loss as You Age

This is a big problem for those who are getting up there in age. This article was on ‘Fox news’ and I know lots don’t watch or read Fox news so am forwarding it on to you as I think it is important.

As you get older, changes in your sex drive, energy levels and memory are all things you have to contend with.
Between 5 and 13 percent of people age 60 to 70 and between 11 and 50 percent of those age 80 and older are affected by sarcopenia(muscle loss)

To help prevent this here are some suggestions:-

1. Eat protein-rich foods.
We do not eat enough protein, calories and amino acids. People who doubled up on protein had an increase in muscle protein synthesis. Eat Eggs, chicken, turkey, fish, dairy, beans and legumes they are all great protein sources. Add a whey protein shake into your diet to get your fill.

2. Off to the Gym:
weight training is crucial because it consistently activates and signals the muscles to grow.
150 to 300 minutes of any type of moderate-endurance exercise a week is so good for your muscles

3.  Sleep.
7 to nine hours is recommended

4. Don’t cut carbs.
You need the energy you get from carbs. Aim to get 6 to 11 servings of whole grains, sweet potatoes, beans, legumes and fruit.

5. Get enough vitamin D.
Sunlight is essential. Also get plenty of orange juice, cereals, fatty fish like salmon and mackerel, beef liver or egg yolks.

6. Limit your alcohol intake.
Not a good one for me but try if you will. Women should limit their alcohol consumption to one glass per day — a 5 ounce glass of wine or a 12 ounce beer — and men should limit it to two.

source

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Weight Loss and Cold Potatoes go Hand in Hand

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I know amazing isn’t it. We have been told for years that “eat potatoes and you will get fat”. Well new studies say “No”. I guess technology has just got that much better that these sort of studies come out with results that we never dreamed of.

Potatoes were imported into Europe in the 16th century. 150 years later they became the staple crop of Europe. Central and Eastern Europe now have become the biggest consumers of potatoes.

Now researchers have found that cold cooked potatoes are virtually fat free and provide an excellent source of fiber. Potatoes also provide vitamin C, vitamins B1 and B6 and are a significant source of potassium.

The central benefit of eating cold cooked potatoes is in resistant starch.
A tasteless form of fiber, resistant starch aids in weight loss due to its slow absorption rate in the small intestine.

This causes most of the dietary bulk of RS to pass as excrement. When potatoes are cooked, then cooled, resistant starch forms tight crystals. These crystals are broken up when the potato is reheated. This slow absorption also gives you the feeling of satiety for a longer period, reducing food intake.
A 2004 “Nutrition and Metabolism” study showed an increase in fat oxidation from eating the meal. It was further shown that the oxidation is sustained by a daily diet containing resistant starch, suggesting that a diet including high resistant starch foods may help you manage your weight.
Source

Another source Mendosa.com

Potatoes are scorned for being so high glycemic. It is true that baked Russet Burbank potatoes (noted Baked) have a GI of about 85, which is considerably higher than that of table sugar.

Among potatoes, new and some white potatoes have the lowest indexes. The reason that new potatoes have a lower GI is probably because most of the amylopectin (It is one of the two components of starch, the other being amylose.) is less branched — it is more like amylose at this immature stage.
New Research shows cooled potato resulted in a significantly lower postprandial [after meal] blood glucose and area under the glucose curve than hot potatoes.

A great way to take advantage of this, according to Professor Jennie Brand-Miller, is to make a potato salad the day before and toss it a vinaigrette dressing. “There are a couple of simple reasons for this,” she writes. “The cold storage increases the potatoes’ resistant starch content by more than a third and the acid in the vinaigrette — whether you make it with lemon juice, lime juice, or vinegar — will slow stomach emptying.”

Sooooo for those who are afraid to eat cold potatoes – “Go for it” It will not make you fat. 

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Ingredients

  • 3 pounds red potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped

Directions

  1. Place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 10-15 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the oil, lemon juice, herbs, vinegar, lemon peel, salt and pepper.
  2. Drain potatoes. Place in a large bowl; add onion. Drizzle with vinaigrette; toss to coat. Serve warm or chill until serving. Yield: 12 servings (3/4 cup each).

Source

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Timmi’s Story : Before Job Loss

This is an article sent to me by a website called The Dollar Stretcher .com. It’s a great shoulda done story,  I am sure we have all got those stories. It is also a “lucky I did” story. This story is especially a warning, “Maybe we should start thinking of these things now, while we have a job, not wait till we are in the unfortunate position of being in the unemployment line”.

Amongst some of the things he wished he had done, he missed mentioning that he should have bought my book “Simply Fantastic Living Better On Less“. This book is full of simple and obvious saving idea’s but ones we forget when times are good. Also lots of warnings and questions, before you jump into unknown areas in your life like relationships and investments.

My Story: Before Job Loss
contributed by Timmi

Things to do before a layoff

Job loss is nothing new to our family. Here’s what I wish I’d done before I’d lost my job:

Wish that we focused on buying a few good quality articles of clothing instead of a bunch of cheap stuff. When the cheap stuff reached the end of its useful life and we had no money for replacements, it was a blow to an already bruised ego to be forced to wear obviously tired clothes.

Wish that I had discovered frugal sites, such as The Dollar Stretcher, earlier.

Wish that in “times of plenty,” we were still frugal.

Wish that I had been cured of my aversion to thrift stores!

Wish that our emergency fund had been larger.

Wish that my studies had been more diverse, so that if one field of training didn’t pan out, I could have switch to other options.

Wish that credit card debt had not been a problem.

And here’s what I’m glad we did before the job loss hit:

Glad that I did not have the habit of weekly salon visits for hair and nails.

Glad that my husband was a trained mechanic. Our cars were old, well-maintained, very reliable, and paid for in cash.

Glad that we had deferred buying a home. We would have lost our home during the lean times.

Glad that I kept a stash of craft supplies. Sometimes my projects brought in a few dollars, but mostly crafts kept me from losing my mind!

Glad that we had always practiced a somewhat frugal lifestyle. The necessary adjustments to our lifestyle weren’t a huge shock to our systems.

Glad that I learned to sew. I whipped up simple little outfit for the girls from my fabric stash. I also made throw cushions, curtains, etc. primarily from fabric that was given to me, and I developed the ability to refashion clothes.
_____________________

My Story is a regular feature of The Dollar Stretcher.com – a site dedicated to “Living Better…for Less”. Visit their library for more information on layoffs.

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Don’t bank on weekend to make up for sleep loss

WASHINGTON – Sleeping in on Saturday after a few weeks of too little shuteye may feel refreshing, but it can give a false sense of security. New research shows chronic sleep loss cannot be cured that easily. Scientists teased apart the effects of short- and long-term sleep loss and found that the chronically sleep-deprived may function normally soon after waking up, but experience steadily slower reaction times as the day wears on, even if they had tried to catch up the previous night.

It is work with important safety implications in an increasingly busy society, not just for shift-workers but for the roughly one in six Americans who regularly get six hours or less of sleep a night.

“We know that staying awake 24 hours in a row impairs performance to a level comparable to a blood-alcohol content beyond the legal limit to drive,” said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Cohen of Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

But when the chronically sleep-deprived pull an all-nighter, “the deterioration is increased tenfold,” Cohen said.

The National Institutes of Health says adults need seven hours to nine hours of sleep for good health. Regularly getting too little increases the risk of health problems, including memory impairment and a weakened immune system. More immediately, too little sleep affects reaction times; sleepiness is to blame for car crashes and other accidents.

The new work shows how two different sleep drives impact the brain, one during the normal waking hours and the other over days and weeks of sleep loss.

It has critically important ramifications for anyone who works “crazy hours” and thinks they are performing fine with a few hours of weeknight sleep, said Shelby Freedman Harris, behavioral sleep-medicine director at New York’s Montefiore Medical Center, who was not involved with the new research.
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