Tag Archives: Know

This Is A Must Watch – I Did Not Know Most Of These

Seven Super easy ways to keep your food fresher, longer!

 

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Did You Know – 03/22/2018

As I am in New Zealand at the moment I thought you may like to know things you did not know about New Zealand


1. The longest place name in the world is Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu, a hill in Hawke’s Bay.

2. No part of the country is more than 128km (79 miles) from the sea.

3. Only 5% of NZ’s population is human the rest are animals.

4. More people die in New Zealand each year playing lawn bowls than scuba diving.


5. New Zealand is similar in size to the UK, but only has a population of about 4 million (compared to 63 million in the UK).

6. Gisborne airport has train tracks running across the middle of the runway. Quite often, trains and planes have to stop until one moves out-of-the-way.

7. NZ has banned all television advertising on Good Friday, Easter Sunday, ANZAC Day, and Christmas Day.

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Did You Know – 02/05/2018

1. I find this fascinating. Who knew there was so much uninhabited land in the UK.

2. 1M Hauly | $220

It doesn’t matter what the money is for—under-the-table hush-money, black market arms deals, or Bugatti purchase—the 1M Hauly is designed to carry exactly $1,000,000 worth of $100 U.S. bank notes while remaining inconspicuous at checkpoints and border crossings. Of course, the near-weightless 20L bag can also be used for normal things like clothes and tools if you haven’t yet run into a nefarious international transaction that needs completed. Made from a stronger-than-kevlar and waterproof Dyneema composite fabric, the 1M Hauly naturally reaches a discreet matte-and-crumpled finish after a few uses. Reliable YKK Uretek zippers form the bag’s closure and provide high humidity protection for the cash, while sturdy haul loops at each end fit a large gloved hand but are sized to work with straps, carabiners, or other attachments.

Length: 18″ / Width: 12″ / Height: 5.75″ / Weight: 0.28 lb (126 g)

3.

 

That poison dart frogs don’t make their own poison. They get it from eating alkaloid rich mites, ants and termites.  Other species however, that exhibit cryptic coloration have low to no amounts of toxicity, eat a much larger variety of prey.

4. 1932 the army in australia went to war against Emu’s as they were destroying the farmland. Apparently the army lost.  Australia, employed soldiers armed with Lewis guns—leading the media to adopt the name “Emu War” when referring to the incident. While a number of the birds were killed, the emu population persisted and continued to cause crop destruction.

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Did You Know – 1/29/2018

  1. 91 people a day die of overdose from drugs like Oxycodone  in USA . Source Dr Oz

 

2. There are fences around London that are made from WWII medical stretchers. During the war Great Britain tore down fences and used the metal for the war effort then recycled the stretchers back into fences when the war ended. These fences still have the curved hand holders.

 

 

3.   Stats on feet –

  •  52 is the total number of bones in your two feet. That accounts for 25% of all the bones in your body. 
  •  40 is the age at which you may need to start shopping for larger shoes. Muscles, tendons and ligaments in the fee weaken with age causing your bones and the rest of your feet to spread out .
  • 250,000 is the number of glands in your feet. (FYI they can secrete up to half a pint of sweat daily)

 

4. Your Smile – Research shows

  • A big grin makes your face more memorable than a neutral expression does.
  • Feedback sent to the brain by uplifted facial muscles and that includes a fake smile can ease anxiety.
  • From a psychological perspective, a person who is smiling appears more trustworthy than a person who is either frowning or holding a neutral expression.
  • According to Shawn Achor, the author of The Happiness Advantage, by making smiling a part of our everyday practice, we help our brains create happiness loops that encourage more positive-thinking patterns.
  • according to biochemist and artist Sondra Barrett. In her book, Secrets of Your Cells, Barrett explains how cells can distinguish between safety and danger, find and repair problems and create an overall sense of balance within the body.

5.  Plants know then they are being eaten. There are certain plants like nasturtiums  that emit toxins as a defense mechanism in response to the sounds of a caterpillars chewing – even when the sound is played as a recording . Who knows this discovery may someday help reduce the use of man-made pesticides. 

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Sushi Cubes! Sushi ready in no time – Great idea

This is so cool. Have not tried it yet but will do and let you know.

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Did You Know – 09/12/2016

Did you know this? I know I did not. I happen to be in New Zealand not so long ago and went to line dancing with my sister-in-law. I was so much fun and I could see the benefits of doing this so am in the process of finding somewhere around here that does it. I was hopeless at it and going left when everyone was going right but I had a laugh and so did they.

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5 Things will is great for your brain when you dance

1. Enhance Neuroplasticity A study led by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, was conducted over a period of 21 years and looked at senior citizens 75 years and older.
The study found that some cognitive activities influence mental acuity, but almost none of the physical activities had any effect except for dancing.

Reading – 35% reduced risk of dementia
Bicycling and swimming – 0% reduced risk of dementia
Doing crossword puzzles at least four days a week – 47% reduced risk of dementia
Playing golf – 0% reduced risk of dementia
Dancing frequently – 76% reduced risk of dementia

2. Increase IntelligenceThe essence of intelligence is making decisions. To improve your mental acuity, it is best to involve yourself in an activity that demands split-second, rapid decision-making. Dancing is an example of a fast-paced activity that demands speedy decision-making.

3. Improve muscle MemoryDancers can achieve complex moves more easily when they undergo the process of “marking”—walking through movements slowly and encoding each movement with a cue.
It was concluded that visualizing movements and “marking” can help improve muscle memory. This type of visualization and marking, learned through dance, can also be used across a variety of fields to optimize performance.

4. It will boost your memory and slow down aging. – As you get older, brain cells die and synapses become weaker. Nouns, like names of people, are harder to remember because there is only one neural pathway that leads us to this stored information.

If you work on learning new things, like dance, you can work on building different mental routes and many paths. So if one path is lost as a result of age, you have an alternative path that you can use to access stored information and memories.

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5. It will help prevent dizzinessHave you ever wondered why ballet dancers don’t get dizzy when they perform pirouettes? Research suggests that through years of practice and training, dancers gain the ability to suppress signals from the balance organs in the inner ear that are linked to the cerebellum.
If you suffer from dizziness, then making time in your schedule for any form of dance is a good way to address this problem. Dancing of any kind will help with dizziness so you don’t have to be a ballet dancer.

 

So Lets go Dancing. Cause “If you don’t do different nothing will change”

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Did You Know – 01/18/2016 – All About Paper Clips

Unknown

Fact One

A paperclip is a piece of steel wire which has been bent into the shape of two almost-complete loops. Pieces of paper can be inserted between the loops and held together. Ingenious!

Fact Two

The design of the paperclip familiar today has never been patented. It is not known for sure who invented it or where it was invented. What is known was that paper clips with the same design were in production in Britain in the 1870s where it was made by the Gem Manufacturing Company Ltd, which suggests – but doesn’t prove – that they may have been invented there. The Gem paperclip, as it became known, was introduced to America in 1892. It went on to become the most common paperclip in use all over the world.

Fact Three

The first patent for the design of a clip that could hold paper together was granted to Samuel B. Fay in the United States in 1867. His invention was actually intended to hold tickets to fabric, and although it could also be used as a clip for paper, it is very different from the paper clip used today. He is therefore NOT the inventor of the paperclip, contrary to popular belief. Below is what Fay’s clip looked like.

Fay's paper clip

Vaaler's paper clipFact Four

It was also widely believed that the paperclip was invented in Norway and a giant paperclip stands outside a business college in Oslo to mark this fact! Johan Vaaler, an inventor, designed a paperclip in 1899 which was patented in Germany and the USA in 1901. However his design, pictured to the left, was impractical and was never put into production. Even so, Vaaler later became credited as the inventor of the paperclip when his patent was discovered sometime in the 1920s by a Norweigan engineer working in Germany. He documented his findings, not realising that Vaaler’s paperclip was different to the “Gem” style one in common use, and the information that the paperclip was a Norweigan invention found its way into dictionaries and encylopedias in the years following the Second World War, despite being inaccurate!

Fact Five

The Swedish word for a paper clip is “gem”.

Fact Six

During the Second World War, wearing a paperclip could have got you into serious trouble. The people living in countries under Nazi German occupation were forbidden from wearing badges or pins depicting national symbols. The paperclip, a seemingly meaningless piece of stationery, became used as a symbol of unity due to the fact that it is used for binding things together. Wearing paperclips became banned once the Germans cottoned on to the reasons for them being worn.

After the war, it was believed that Norweigans wore paper clips during the war as a sign of national pride because it was a Norweigan invention. In fact, the information that the paper clip was a Norweigan invention, although incorrect, wasn’t even widely known during the war. People just wore paper clips to symbolise unity and solidarity.  

Fact Seven

The paperclip is widely used as the symbol for an attachment in most email services.

Fact EightClippy

Clippy was an animated paperclip that used to appear in Microsoft Office products to offer help. He made his first appearance in Office 97 and last appearance in Office 2003. He was most famous for tapping the inside of the monitor when he appeared and regularly saying “It looks like you’re writing a letter.” Oh, the memories!

If you miss Clippy and need him to help you with Microsoft’s newer versions of Office, you can download Ribbon Hero 2: Clippy’s Second Chance from here! http://www.ribbonhero.com/

Fact Nine

Project Paperclip was an American operation to fly German scientists out of Germany and over to the USA after the Second World War. The Americans wanted to make use of the scientific and engineering intellect and expertise of the Germans, and to ensure that they didn’t fall into the hands of the Soviet Union. One of them, Wernher von Braun, was a rocket scientist who would assist the Americans with developing the rockets that would eventually take people to the Moon. Von Braun also worked on ideas for manned missions to Mars.

Fact Ten

Kyle Macdonald from Canada managed to swap a red paperclip for a house by completing a series of online trades, swapping each item for something of a higher value. He started by swapping his paperclip for a fish-shaped pen, which was then swapped for a door knob, and then a barbecue, and so on. His project gained publicity and the items given in exchange for previous items became more and more valuable and unique, until Kyle was eventually able to complete his final exchange and achieve his goal, when he traded a role in a film (Donna on Demand) for a house in the town of Kipling in Saskatchewan, Canada. All from one red paperclip. More information about Kyle’s project is available here: http://oneredpaperclip.blogspot.co.uk/

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