Tag Archives: influenza

Lauric Acid In Coconut Oil

Seems like this Coconut stuff is a miracle maker. It can’t do any harm so probably a good thing to put in your kids and your own smoothie. I am not sure I would take it by the spoonful I don’t think would be my favorite thing to do.

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Lauric Acid in Coconut Oil

Certain components of coconut oil are exceptionally important. Lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid found mainly in coconut oil, is one of these prized substances. Pure coconut oil contains about 50 percent lauric acid, and is the most abundant natural source of lauric acid available.
When lauric acid is present in the body, it is converted into monolaurin, a monoglyceride compound that exhibits antiviral, antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antifungal properties. It acts by disrupting the lipid membranes in organisms such as fungus, bacteria and viruses, thus destroying them.

Monolaurin is an effective treatment for Candida albicans and fungal infections such as ringworm and athlete’s foot. Monolaurin also specifically targets bacterial infections as well as lipid-coated viruses such as herpes, the measles, influenza, hepatitis C and HIV. Researchers in the Philippines have even begun studies to prove the effectiveness of lauric acid against HIV/AIDS because of its strong antiviral properties. And lauric acid is non-toxic, which gives it a distinct advantage over the pharmaceutical drugs that are typically used to fight viruses, bacterial infections and fungal infections.

Without a plentiful source of lauric acid, the body cannot produce monolaurin, and all of these important benefits are lost. Many people who regularly consume coconut oil experience less illness than others. Breast milk is the only other natural source that contains as high a concentration of lauric acid, which could explain the notably fewer infections of all types in breast-fed babies.

Unfortunately, the lauric acid content of foods and infant formulas has been rapidly decreasing over the years. Manufacturers and consumers alike have turned from using coconut oil and have replaced it with cheap vegetable oils, obliterating lauric acid intake in the process.

There is no recommended daily allowance (RDA) for lauric acid, but as a guideline, Dr. Mary G. Enig suggests adults and growing children can benefit from an intake of 10 to 20 grams of lauric acid per day. (2-4 tablespoons of coconut oil.) It’s interesting to note that nursing babies consume up to 1 gram of lauric acid per kilogram of body weight per day.

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Did You Know – 09/04/2012

1. The doors in public buildings open outward to allow a large number of people quick exit in case of danger, such as fire. If the doors opened inward, people might pile up at the exit as everyone pushed to get through at once instead of stepping back to allow space for the door to be opened.
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2. 100 years ago: Most women washed their hair only once a month using egg yolks for shampoo. Eggs cost about 10 cents per dozen. Cannabis and heroin were available over the counter at corner drugstores.Back then pharmacists said ‘Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to the mind, regulates the stomach and bowels, and is, in fact– a perfect guardian of health.’ Pneumonia and influenza were the leading causes of death.
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3. The reason why we nod our heads for “yes” and shake it for “no” was first explained by Charles Darwin. He related the gestures to a baby’s nursing habits. The nod, the forward head motion, is the breast-seeking pattern. Shaking the head from side to side – gesturing “no” – is a breast-rejecting motion. This is confirmed by the fact that a baby born deaf and blind will nod for yes and shake its head for no.
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4. It is believed that Shakespeare was 46 around the time that the King James Version of the Bible was written. In Psalms 46, the 46th word from the first word is shake and the 46th word from the last word is spear.
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Another interesting source


5. Eggs are a symbol of new life that returns to nature at Easter Time. The custom of exchanging eggs began long before Easter was celebrated. It was the custom of Egyptians, Persians, Gauls, Greeks and Romans to whom the eggs was a symbol of new life. They exchanged eggs decorated in spring colors and believed that the Earth was hatched from an egg.
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6. The Main Library at Indiana University sinks over an inch every year because when it was built, engineers failed to take into account the weight of all the books that would occupy the building.
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