Tag Archives: horses

Budweiser Clydesdale Horses Snowball Fight

I know this was an advert from 2005 but I did not see it and think it is so funny. Sharing in case you did not see it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Did You Know – 04/11/2016

main-qimg-c27a6f8eb1a67ab75f216813a7541f43

1.. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida is the world’s fourth largest building by volume. Completed in 1966, the VAB also holds the record of the largest one-story building in the world and the tallest building outside an urban center in the United States.
The VAB is so large, in fact, that it has its own weather. On humid days, rain clouds can form below the ceiling, requiring about 10,000 tons of air conditioning equipment to control the moisture. With this setup, the total volume of air in the building can be replaced in only one hour.
Source and more information

Cd0CoEMWwAAK8QB.jpg-large
2. When a male bee climaxes, their testicles explode then they die.
Strange as it is, this actually makes evolutionary sense: the snapped-off penis acts as a genital plug to prevent other drones from fertilizing the queen. Isn’t nature amazing!
source

blue-whale-heart-model-300x215

3. The blue whale is a massive creature and is the largest living animal in the world; even larger than most dinosaurs.
The largest of the blue whales can measure in at over 100 ft in length and can weigh in excess of 180 tons at its largest.
In fact everything about the blue whale is large including its, arteries and its heart.
On average most blue whales grow to be around 70 – 90 ft in length, weigh around 100 – 150 tons.
In order to get blood through the blue whales large body it has massive arteries, which pump blood through the heart and into its major vital organs.
The arteries are so large in fact that a full size human could swim through them.
The aorta alone measures in at over 9 inches!
The blue whales heart can weigh in excess of 1,300 lbs.
In terms of size the blue whales heart is about the size of a small car.
At a rate of 8 – 10 beats per minute the blue whale’s heartbeat can be heard from over 2 miles away.
source

images
4. Hydrogen is a light, odorless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.
Interesting concept: – Edward R. Harrison, a cosmologist at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He writes in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society that yes, our universe may well have been created by intelligent beings in another universe. That assertion does nothing to explain how the whole thing began. It just moves the question back a step: Where did the universe inhabited by those intelligent beings come from? But Harrison’s idea would explain some very strange things about our universe, such as how exactly right for life it is.

The history of the Universe has been summed up thusly: “Hydrogen is a light, odorless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.” When our universe began, it consisted mostly of hydrogen. That gas condensed into galaxies of stars, in whose cores heat and pressure fused atoms into heavier elements, including those necessary for life. Some of those stars exploded, spewing the heavier elements out into space. New stars and planets formed, including our own. On one of those planets, life appeared. Harrison contends that none of it could have happened unless all the physical constants (the speed of light, the charge and mass of the electron, and similar numbers) were just right. Reviewing the work of a long line of cosmologists, Harrison sums up what has come to be known as the Anthropic Principle: the Universe is the way it is because we exist. He explains: “In a universe containing luminous stars and chemical elements essential for the existence of organic life, the physical constants are necessarily precisely adjusted (or finely tuned). Slight deviations from the observed values could result in a starless and lifeless universe.”
More information for those interested

rsz_black_riding_boots
5. Humans rode bareback or mounted horses with a simple blanket after they first domesticated the animals, thousands of years after the dawn of agriculture. The leather saddle first straddled a horse’s back in China perhaps as far back as the third century B.C. But the saddle was only one step toward transforming the use of cavalry as a means of waging war. Climbing onto a horse while bearing weapons had long presented its own precarious hazards. Cambyses II, a Persian king in the sixth century B.C., died after stabbing himself as he vaulted onto a horse.
The stirrup – such an important innovation was that it allowed the rider immensely greater control in horsemanship: rider and animal became almost extensions of each other. It was possible to shoot arrows accurately while the horse dashed ahead at full gallop. A cavalryman could brace himself in the saddle and, with a lance positioned under his arm, use the tremendous force of the charging horse to strike a stunned enemy. The horse’s sheer mass and quickness became an implement of the cavalry’s weaponry—and a powerful intimidation factor.
More info

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Did You Know – 01/04/2016

Two-Horses-Asses.jpg

  1. The Origins of engineering specs and government decisions.Ever wonder where engineering specifications come from? The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches, an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and the English built the first US railroads. 

    Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that is the gauge they used. 

    Why did they use that particular gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used the same wheel spacing. 

    Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing? 

    Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on the old, long distance roads in England, because that’s the spacing of the wheel ruts in the granite sets. 

    So, who built those old rutted roads? Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since. 

    And the ruts in the roads? Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else chose to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for (or by) Imperial Rome, they all had the same wheel spacing. 

    The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the specification for an Imperial Roman war chariot. 

    Specifications and Bureaucracies live forever. The Imperial man of war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war-horses. 

    Now let’s cut to the present… 

    The Space Shuttle, sitting on its launch pad, has two booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRB’s. Thiokol builds SRB’s at its factory in Utah. The engineers who designed the SRB’s wanted to make them a bit fatter, but the SRB’s had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site. 

    The railroad line from the factory has to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRB’s had to fit through that tunnel, which is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track is about as wide as two horses’ behinds. 

    So…. a major design feature of what is arguably the world’s most advanced transportation system was determined two thousand years ago by a horse’s ass. 

    Which is pretty much how most government decisions are still made today.

2. What plug to look for :-

Useful Guide for getting it in 1.jpg

Useful Guide for getting it in 2.jpg

 

 

Unknown.jpeg

3.  Almost no one uses real tin foil these days. The stuff we all call “tin foil” is actually aluminium foil. Originally foil was made of tin but it gave (not surprisingly) a tin flavor to whatever it touched. It was heavier than modern aluminium foil, which has its benefits but not enough to keep it going strong in our kitchens. Aluminium foil began to surpass tin foil after World War II but it had been available since 1910 when it was first produced by “Dr. Lauber, Neher & Cie.” a Swiss company using the force of a waterfall to drive the foil making machinery. Its first use in the US was as a wrapper on Life Savers candy in 1913.

Interesting Fact: Tin foil was used to fill cavities in teeth before the 20th century. Gross because have you ever  had Aluminum foil touch your teeth?

source

Unknown-1.jpeg

4. That most of the gold held in reserve in the United States of America is stored at Fort Knox right? Actually, it isn’t. In reality, most of the gold in the US is stored at the Federal Reserve Vault at Wall Street in New York. Another interesting fact is that most of that gold doesn’t even belong to the US – it belongs to foreign accounts! Given the state of the US dollar at the moment maybe the US government should nationalize it all in what would probably be the largest gold theft in history!

Source

 

images-1.jpeg

5. Gandhi was not always the peaceful man he is well-known for being – in fact, he was never a pure pacifist in that he allowed for violence as a last resort. In his middle ages he volunteered to fight in three wars: The Boer War, The Zulu War, and World War I. Furthermore, after an attack by Muslims on Hindus he approved of the government’s order to shoot ten Muslims for every Hindu that was killed. In a famous statement about independence, Gandhi said: “If a fight is inevitable I would expect every son of the soil to contribute his mite… I would not flinch from sacrificing a million lives for India’s liberty.” [Source]

Interesting Fact: During the freedom struggle, he wore nothing but a loin cloth, but for years he lived in London and used to wear a silk hat and spats and carried a cane (as seen above).

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Great Music and wonderful Story

 

These are horses that have been abandoned and abused and rehabilitated to trust.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles

Poem Friday – Happy Birthday Mika!

Today is a special day for me, my granddaughters birthday
She is a ray of sunshine, great to have around in every way

Those 12 years have gone so fast, just a flash
We don’t always see those moments because we are rushing, have to dash

She has turned into a beautiful flower
Great sense of humor, playful, busy every hour

She has great musical talent, which I admire
She rides horses with a passion of fire

Watching her grow has been a blessing and reflective
Her personality bright and very infective

Well happy birthday Mika, you are 12 today
May you have fun in the best possible way

Nana L

Leave a comment

Filed under Articles