Tag Archives: Garlic

Home made Hoisin sauce

 

Ingredients

  • Juice of an orange (remove the pits)
  • 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, grated
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, grated
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar or white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon raw honey
  • 5 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon Chinese five-spice powder
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
  • 1 teaspoon tomato paste

Procedure

  1. Add all ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Bring ingredients to a boil, then turn the heat down to very low.
  3. Whisk and simmer gently for five minutes, stirring frequently to prevent the sauce from sticking to the pan.
  4. Set aside in a ramekin. Leftovers can last up to two weeks when stored in an airtight container.

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How To Grow Garlic


Find out when to plant garlic in your region. In general, the best times for planting are mid-autumn or early spring.
Garlic grows well in a wide range of climates. It does less well in areas of high heat or humidity, or where there is a lot of rainfall.


Choose a planting spot and prepare the soil. Garlic needs a lot of full sun, but it might tolerate partial shade provided it’s not for very long during the day or growing season. The soil must be well dug over and crumbly. Sandy loam is best.
Before adding nutrients to your soil, you should know what is already there. If you haven’t done a soil test, contact your local county extension office for a soil sampling kit.[1]
Ensure that the soil has good drainage. Clay-based soils are not good for planting garlic.
Use compost and manure to add nutrients to the soil before planting the garlic.

Source fresh garlic. Garlic is grown by planting the cloves — called seeds for our purposes — so to get started all you need to do is buy fresh garlic. Choose garlic from a store, or even better, a farm stand or the local farmers market. It’s very important that the garlic bulbs chosen are fresh and of high quality. If you can, choose organic garlic so that you avoid garlic that has been sprayed with chemicals.
Choose fresh garlic bulbs with large cloves. Avoid garlic that has become soft.
Each clove will sprout into a garlic plant, so keep that in mind when you’re figuring out how many heads to buy.
If you have some garlic at home that has sprouted, that’s great to use.
Nurseries also offer garlic bulbs for planting. Visit a nursery if you want to get a specific variety or to get advice on local conditions for garlic.
Mail-order catalogs and online seed stores offer many types of garlic and will include specific planting instructions for the type of seed you buy.

Break the cloves from a fresh garlic head. Be careful not to damage the cloves at their base, where they attach to the garlic plate. If the base is damaged, the garlic will not grow.
Plant the larger cloves. The smaller cloves take up just as much space in the planting bed, but they produce much smaller bulbs.

Push each clove into the soil. Point the tips upward and plant the cloves about 2 inches (5cm) deep.
The cloves should be spaced about 8 inches (20cm) apart for best growing conditions.


Cover the planted cloves with mulch. Suitable toppings include hay, dry leaves, straw, compost, well rotted manure, or well rotted grass clippings.

Fertilize the cloves or top-dress with compost. The planted garlic needs a complete fertilizer at the time of planting.
Fertilize again in the spring if you are planting your garlic in the fall, or in the fall if you’re planting it in the spring.

Water the plants when necessary. Newly planted garlic needs to be kept moist to help the roots to develop. Don’t overdo the water, however, as garlic does not grow well, or may even rot, if sodden during cold months.
Water deeply once a week if rain has not fallen. Watering garlic is not necessary unless there is a drought, in which case water sparingly, as garlic hates wet soil.
Reduce the watering gradually as the season warms up. The garlic needs a hot, dry summer to allow the bulbs to mature.

Take care of pests. Insects, mice, and other creatures may come to eat the garlic or make a nest among the plants. Beware the following pests:
Aphids seem to enjoy garlic leaves, and the flower buds. They’re easy to get rid of — simply rub your fingers over them and squash them or apply a pesticide.
Many people tend to plant garlic underneath roses to deter aphids; the roses benefit from the aphids being drawn away.
Mice and other small creatures sometimes nest in mulch. If you have a problem with mice in your area, consider using plastic mulch or landscaping fabric.

Eat some scapes. As the garlic plants begin to grow, long green stalks called scapes will emerge. Pull off a few scapes and eat them if you wish. The best part of the scape is the young, tender shoot.
This may damage the garlic bulbs themselves, so don’t do it to every plant.
Use gloves when pulling off scapes; otherwise your hands will smell of garlic for days.

Note the signs of readiness for harvesting. Garlic bulbs are ready to be harvested when you can feel the individual cloves in the bulb, and the leaves turn yellow or brown.
Once the scapes start to dry, it is important to harvest the garlic or the head will “shatter” and divide into the individual cloves.
Begin harvesting at the end of the summer. Harvesting can continue well into autumn in most places.
Some warm climates may enable earlier harvesting of garlic.

Loosen the area around each bulb with a shovel or garden fork. Pull the bulbs out of the ground. If using a fork, be careful not to stab the bulbs underground.
Be careful with the digging process, since garlic tends to bruise easily.
The plants should be kept complete and unwashed, and hung up to “cure” for two weeks. The ideal temperature is 80°F (26.7°C) for curing. Once cured, the outer flaky layers of the bulb can be brushed off, leaving clean skin below. Trim the tops and the roots, and store in a cool, dry place.
Washing garlic will prolong the curing process and potentially cause it to rot. Also, if the garlic is not cured, it will rot quickly in the pantry.

Store garlic in a cool, dry place in your home. Dried bulbs can be kept in a garlic keeper (usually made from pottery), and individual cloves can be pulled off as needed.

 

Make a garlic plait or braid. The dried leaves can be kept back and plaited or braided into a strand, from which you can hang the garlic bulbs in your pantry or kitchen. This is both decorative and useful.

To Learn more got to Wikihow.com a great source of information

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Quick Healthy Meal – Healthy Honey Garlic Shrimp Stir-Fry

This looks to be a great quick easy meal for those who have little time to cook and make it healthy. Rice takes no time and the broccoli a quick steam together with the shrimp and wallah – Done

Here are the quantities if you missed them

Recipe – Ingredients:1 1/2 t.fresh garlic, 2 t. fresh ginger, 1/3 c. soy sauce, 1/2 t. crushed red pepper, 1 T. olive oil, 1/3 c. honey Directions: Put shrimp into plastic bag and marinade in the 1/2 the sauce for 15 min. in the fridge; then saute mixture in the olive oil in a frying pan till tender; top with remaining sauce and serve

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The Danger of Rare Gene which Causes Resistance To Bacteria

 

Just read this article from the website of Dr Mercola who is  well-respected in the field of medicine. It is well worth the read and I believe everyone should be aware of the dangers of these resistant drugs.

I Will give you an outline of what it is about.

It has been suggested that deaths from antibiotic-resistant disease will reach 10 million per year. Drivers of this disease is antibiotics in agriculture, Hospitals, CRE- (carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae) which produces an enzyme that breaks down antibiotics

Strategies to protect yourself and help prevent the spread of are:-

  1. Infection prevention, with a focus on strengthening your immune system naturally. Avoiding sugars, processed foods and grains, stress reduction, and optimizing your sleep and vitamin D level are foundational for this. Adding in traditionally fermented and cultured foods is also important, as this will help optimize your microbiome.

The Nitric Oxide Dump exercise (below) will also help improve your immune status. Contrary to supplements that boost immune function, which should be taken only as needed, the Nitric Oxide Dump exercise is a preventive method that should ideally be done daily.

2. Limiting your use of antibiotics. Any time your doctor prescribes an antibiotic, ask if it’s absolutely necessary, and keep in mind that antibiotics do not work for viral infections. For example, antibiotics are typically unnecessary for most ear infections, and they do not work on the common cold or flu, both of which are caused by viruses.

3. Avoiding antibiotics in food by purchasing organic or biodynamic grass-fed meats and animal products.

4. Avoiding antibacterial household products such as antibacterial soaps, hand sanitizers and wipes, as these promote antibiotic resistance by allowing the strongest bacteria to survive and thrive in your home.

5. Properly washing your hands with warm water and plain soap, to prevent the spread of bacteria. Be particularly mindful of washing your hands and kitchen surfaces after handling raw meats, as about half of all meat sold in American grocery stores is likely to be contaminated with pathogenic bacteria. Avoid antibiotic soaps that typically have dangerous chemicals like triclosan.

6. Common-sense precautions in the kitchen: Kitchens are notorious breeding grounds for disease-causing bacteria, courtesy of contaminated meat products, including antibiotic-resistant strains of E-coli. To avoid cross-contamination between foods in your kitchen, adhere to the following recommendations:

  • Use a designated cutting board, preferably wood, not plastic, for raw meat and poultry, and never use this board for other food preparation, such as cutting up vegetables. Color coding your cutting boards is a simple way to distinguish between them
  • To sanitize your cutting board, use hot water and detergent. Simply wiping it off with a rag will not destroy the bacteria
  • For an inexpensive, safe and effective kitchen counter and cutting board sanitizer, use 3 percent hydrogen peroxide and vinegar. Keep each liquid in a separate spray bottle, and then spray the surface with one, followed by the other, and wipe off
  • Coconut oil can also be used to clean, treat and sanitize your wooden cutting boards. It’s loaded with lauric acid that has potent antimicrobial actions. The fats will also help condition the wood

These recommendation come from Dr Mercola’s article.That is why I recommend you read it as it could save you and your family’s life.

My recommendation is   Precaution of the water you drink 💦 – Antibiotic residue can be found in the water you drink. The  Kangen water machine will filter and enhance the quality of the water  to strengthen your immune system. I personally have experienced this.

These are the natural Immune Boosters

Garlic

Oregano Extract

Cinnamon

Colloidal Silver

Manuka honey

Echinacea

Sunlight and Vitamin D

This is the video of Nitric Oxide dump which has many many benefits

 

 

 

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How To Make Garlic Parm Bacon Knots – Delishimo

This would be great for drink nibbles

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Did You Know- 02/27/2017

disney-gossip-girl-halloween-costumes

1. When women gossip, their levels of the ‘Love Hormone’ oxytocin go up. This is according to researchers from the University of Pavia in Italy. This makes the gossipers feel closer to each other regardless of their mood or personality type. Another way of getting the Oxytocin shot is by giving your friend a hug. Now that is more positive I am thinking.

Source

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2. Garlic repairs glass cracks? yep amazing. If you have a glass with a hairline crack, try cutting a garlic clove in half and gently rubbing it against the cracks. The high concentration of sucrose compounds will act as an adhesive.

Source

 

Zealandia

zealandia_topography

 

3. Most of us thought there was only 7 continents. Apparently not. Geologists are now arguing there is an 8th. ‘Zealandia’ consists of NZ and Caledonia. It could be known as the smallest continent of all. It is not official as yet but will be when enough scientists get on board.

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4. A few times each year, thousands of fish meet up to for one giant ‘tuna tornado’ because they do most of their breeding outside their bodies. The tuna gather themselves into a living tornado of reproduction, which acts as a moving wall that encircles a protected space where they can release a large volume of egg and sperm all at once .

Source

skittles-cattle

5. Some farmers feed their cows Skittles. The reason being candy, chocolate, cereal or molasses is a cheap substitute for corn. The sugar reportedly helps cows with digestion,, increase milk production and fattens up the beef cattle. Mars, inc sells their unused skittles to companies that melt them down and add them to livestock feed which is cheaper to buy than corn as corn at times is to high a price to be economical.

Source

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One-Pot Lemon Garlic Shrimp Pasta

Hey easy and yummy.

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