Tag Archives: garden

Use Your Kangen Water In The Garden

 

 

Growing vegetables on the patio in backyard: beans, tomato, rainbow chard, lettuce salad greens, boxwood, lattice fence, herbs neatly edged with bamboo

I am a gardener and you may be too. I thought this article rather interesting.

Gardening with Kangen Water®

Gardening with Enagic® Water is a great way to keep your plants and flowers healthy, enlivened, and lush. Just like your body needs clean, alkaline, and chlorine-free Kangen Water® for health, your plants also need the healthy water for optimal growth and nourishment. The water from your Enagic® machine can even revitalize weak plants, making them stronger and more vibrant than ever before! Enagic® Water stimulates germination and seedling development, leaving your plants in peak condition without the use of harmful chemicals.

Nourishing vegetables and flowers with Enagic® Water in your own garden means you can save money at the grocery store and florist, reduce (or eliminate) the amount of pesticides in your home, and even cut down on all the wasted resources associated with transporting plants, flowers, and produce across the globe. Lowering your carbon footprint has never been so rewarding! You can even use your fragrant flowers to make your own perfume.

Get back to basics, and discover how your Enagic® machine can help you grow a green, beautiful garden.

You first need to decide which Enagic® Water is right for your plants. Plants have different preferences in pH for water and soil, and the water you use will have a big impact on your plant health and growth2. Here is a general list of the plants that thrive in slightly alkaline, neutral, and slightly acidic water and soil:

Plants that Prefer Slightly Alkaline Kangen Water®
(pH 8.5 – 9.5)

Most of these plants show optimal growth in the 7.5 – 8.5, so you can experiment between Kangen Water® 8.5 and Neutral Water (pH 7.0) to find the best results. The pH of your soil will have a big impact on which water you should use. These plants include: asparagus, beets, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, carrots, mushrooms, parsley, geraniums, irises, phlox, vinca, hydrangeas (for pink blooms), and lilacs. Hydrangeas are a rare plant, as the pH of your water will change the color of the blooms.

Plants that Prefer Slightly Acidic Water
(pH 4.0 – 6.0)

Some plants prefer slightly acidic water and soil. Set your SD501 to pH 5.0 for the following vegetables and plants: rhododendrons, begonias, azaleas, heathers, hydrangeas (for blue blooms), peanuts, cucumbers, potatoes, dill, leeks, chili peppers, eggplant, garlic, chives, artichoke, tomatoes, and most berries. Roses grow most vibrantly with pH 5.5 – 6.5, so you may want to experiment with Slightly Acidic Water (set at pH 6.0) and Neutral Water (pH 7.0) to see which one yields the healthiest roses with your particular soil. Remember to always take into consideration the pH of your soil when you choose which Enagic® Water to use on your plants.

Plants that Prefer Neutral Water
(pH 7.0)

Many vegetables and plants thrive in a neutral pH. These plants include spinach, parsnips, dahlias, chrysanthemums, brussels sprouts, sweet peas, broccoli, asparagus, beans, avocado, cantaloupe, kiwi, mint, lettuce, onions, yams, radishes, squash, bell peppers, and tulips. Use Enagic® Neutral Water to keep these plants hydrated and healthy.

No matter which Enagic® Water you choose for your garden, you can have peace of mind that your plants will be healthy with this clean, high-quality water. And think of how delicious your fruits and vegetables will taste after they’ve been watered with your Enagic® machine instead of chlorinated tap water!

Here are some other helpful tips for a successful Kangen Garden:

  1. Always plan ahead. Sketch your garden with pen and paper so you have a clear plan of where everything will be planted. Smaller plants should be in the front and bigger plants in the back.
  2. Water your plants in the morning or late evening, when it is not too hot outside. In the winter, water your plants when the temperature is above 40 degrees with no snow cover.
  3. Make sure to read the planting instructions of each of your plants so you know exactly how much Enagic® Water they need.
  4. Plants need additional watering in windy climates, as the wind can dry out the earth and plants quickly.
  5. If your soil could use a boost, use your own Kangen Compost. This homemade organic fertilizer will bring new life your soil and plants!

Gardening is a fun, sustainable, and environmentally responsible decision that will help sustain your family’s overall wellness. You and your children have much to gain from greening your home with a garden. Find out how you can improve your life and surroundings by growing your very own Enagic® Garden!

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Kangen water and the Enagic machines which I believe every household should have one. Go to http://www.lifechanging-water.com

You will find a free Ebook on the subject plus you can learn about the great compensation plan that it has if you are interested in a very profitable home base business.


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Interesting Article on Cucumbers

 

I did not know this about the nutritional value of cucumbers.

 

Cucumbers are one of my most highly recommended vegetables, and if you have a garden, you can easily grow them at home. Aside from being able to control pesticide and fertilizer use, you’ll also avoid the wax applied to many commercially sold cucumbers. There are dozens of varieties that thrive in both cool and warm climates, although they can be a challenge to grow if temperatures are consistently in the mid-90s.

While made up of 90 to 95 percent water, cucumbers still manage to provide a host of valuable nutrients, including vitamins A, B5, C and K, along with manganese, potassium, magnesium, molybdenum, copper, silica and fiber. Cucumbers also contain lignans that bind with estrogen-related bacteria in the digestive tract, contributing to a reduced risk of several cancers, including breast, uterus, ovarian and prostate cancer.

Other phytonutrients called cucurbitacins — part of a larger group known as triterpenes, and the part of the cucumber that gives it a bitter taste — also inhibit cancer cell development. Preliminary findings also suggest cucumbers have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

In traditional medicine, cucumbers are used to treat headaches. The seeds are diuretic, and the juice — thanks to caffeic acid and vitamin C — can be used as an acne treatment and a soothing remedy for tired, puffy eyes.

More information on the subject

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Did You Know – 01/24/2017

  1. When you should plant in your garden
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2.  A giant Celtic cross design, only visible from the sky, has been discovered growing in an Irish forest. The 100-meter (330ft) long religious symbol remained undetected for years until airline passengers noticed it while flying overhead.

The cross in Killea forest in county Donegal caused much confusion until an investigation by UTV revealed it wasn’t aliens bored with crop circles but was instead planned by Liam Emmery, a very creative and talented forester.

Meticulously planting hundreds of trees over a period of years Emmery was able to plan out the design which would reveal itself every autumn to those flying overhead.

Unfortunately Emmery passed away in 2010 aged 51, before his creation became known to the public. His wife had forgotten about his elaborate plan until UTV approached her about it, telling them “I’d forgotten about the plantation, if he was here, we would have all heard about it because he would have been so proud.”

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3. There is a “Hangover Bar” in Amsterdam .
It’s the first of its kind in the world – a mecca for anyone who partied a little too hard the night before.
Only open from Friday to Sunday, The Hangover Bar has everything a boozer needs to get back on track.
There’s no cheating your way in for a free bed either – there are ‘hangover inspectors’ guarding the doors.
They breathalyze  you on entry to make sure you still have alcohol in your system – the very opposite of a sobriety test.
Once inside, a green oasis awaits, ready to meet all your hangover needs.
There are beds laid out with accompanying televisions to play your favourite TV shows.
Green turf and towering pot plants weave their way around them, and there’s an oxygen bar to speed up the recovery process.
Foodora has created a special food menu featuring vitamin-boosting smoothies.

“To overcome a hangover there are a few things you need: a good mattress, good food, fun and lots of vitamins”
Joep Verbunt
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Source

4. Bob Marley’s youngest son, Damian is turning a former prison for non-violent drug offenders into a pot farm. The Coalinga, CA, prison will grow medical marijuana for state dispensaries is providing 100 new jobs, and its $4.1 million sale has already erased all of the towns debt

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Source

5.  Difficulty with eye contact may be a sign of a good conversationalist. A pair of researchers from Kyoto University studied this.  “The dual task of maintaining eye contact (and the inherent intimate connection it involves) while also racking the brain for a word to meet the request is just too demanding – to save itself, the brain pushes for breaking eye contact so it can focus exclusively on finding a word that will fulfill the obligation.”

Essentially, breaking eye contact allows us to better choose our words. Looking someone in the eye may help us better establish an emotional rapport, but looking elsewhere may actually stimulate better conversation.

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Place These Leaves Around the House and Never See A Cockroach Again

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This time of year there are cockroaches everywhere.
You may discover them anywhere in the world as their adaptability is extremely established. They are among the most resistant types in the world as they support high levels of radiation and can even live without food for more than a month at a time. These insects are omnivores, eating both plant-based and animal-based foods. For these reasons we can find cockroaches everywhere, feeding upon almost anything they find.

Cockroaches leave chemical trace markers in their droppings. With this method, others can easily find sources of water or food. This is a leading method of communication between them which one main reason why they can quickly infest an area. Remarkable, I know… However, we will help you to get rid of these nasty bugs at last!

If you want to get rid of cockroaches that are in your home, we advise that you try this trick which is very efficient. This is a good option if you have kids or family pets, because you will avoid commercial and dangerous toxins.

The Surprisingly Powerful and Natural Cockroach Repellent

Bay leaves are the very best natural cockroach repellent. This herb can’t eliminate them, however it does drives them away quickly since the smell is unbearable for the cockroach. Place laurel branches in every corner of the house.

Place 10 bay leaves in the garden or in the kitchen area and you will never ever see cockroaches strolling around. They are perfect for areas where food is stored such as the kitchen or pantry since they are safe and non-toxic. Likewise, we recommend putting bay leaves in your garden especially if you have a pet. This way you will eliminate cockroaches without worrying about your kids or animals security.
You can use fresh bay leaves or dry. But the best way to use these leaves is to crush dry leaves and make a powder. They create a much stronger smell used by doing this.

Source: Healthy Holistic

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Signs You See Only In Australia

On the golf course

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The Outback Waterhole

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The Friendly Beach Welcome

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The Unnecessary Warning

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The No Brainer

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The Garden Centre

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The Honest Truth

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The Humble Apron


Remember making an apron in Home Economics? Maybe you didnt but your Grandparents probably did. This makes interesting reading.

The History of ‘APRONS’

I don’t think our kids even know
what an apron is.

The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath, because she only had a few, it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and they used less material, but along with that, it served as a potholder for removing:

  • Hot pans from the oven.
  • It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears..
  • From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.
  • When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.
  • And when the weather was cold grandma wrapped it around her arms.
  • Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow,
  • bent over the hot wood stove.
  • Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.
  • From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables.
  • After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.
  • In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.
  • When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.
  • When dinner was ready,Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the menfolks knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

REMEMBER:

Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

I don’t think I ever caught anything from an apron

I don’t know who wrote this but it brought back memories for me about my Mom and Grandmother. 

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