Tag Archives: Gandhi

Did You Know – 01/04/2016

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  1. The Origins of engineering specs and government decisions.Ever wonder where engineering specifications come from? The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches, an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and the English built the first US railroads. 

    Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that is the gauge they used. 

    Why did they use that particular gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used the same wheel spacing. 

    Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing? 

    Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on the old, long distance roads in England, because that’s the spacing of the wheel ruts in the granite sets. 

    So, who built those old rutted roads? Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since. 

    And the ruts in the roads? Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else chose to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for (or by) Imperial Rome, they all had the same wheel spacing. 

    The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the specification for an Imperial Roman war chariot. 

    Specifications and Bureaucracies live forever. The Imperial man of war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war-horses. 

    Now let’s cut to the present… 

    The Space Shuttle, sitting on its launch pad, has two booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRB’s. Thiokol builds SRB’s at its factory in Utah. The engineers who designed the SRB’s wanted to make them a bit fatter, but the SRB’s had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site. 

    The railroad line from the factory has to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRB’s had to fit through that tunnel, which is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track is about as wide as two horses’ behinds. 

    So…. a major design feature of what is arguably the world’s most advanced transportation system was determined two thousand years ago by a horse’s ass. 

    Which is pretty much how most government decisions are still made today.

2. What plug to look for :-

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3.  Almost no one uses real tin foil these days. The stuff we all call “tin foil” is actually aluminium foil. Originally foil was made of tin but it gave (not surprisingly) a tin flavor to whatever it touched. It was heavier than modern aluminium foil, which has its benefits but not enough to keep it going strong in our kitchens. Aluminium foil began to surpass tin foil after World War II but it had been available since 1910 when it was first produced by “Dr. Lauber, Neher & Cie.” a Swiss company using the force of a waterfall to drive the foil making machinery. Its first use in the US was as a wrapper on Life Savers candy in 1913.

Interesting Fact: Tin foil was used to fill cavities in teeth before the 20th century. Gross because have you ever  had Aluminum foil touch your teeth?

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4. That most of the gold held in reserve in the United States of America is stored at Fort Knox right? Actually, it isn’t. In reality, most of the gold in the US is stored at the Federal Reserve Vault at Wall Street in New York. Another interesting fact is that most of that gold doesn’t even belong to the US – it belongs to foreign accounts! Given the state of the US dollar at the moment maybe the US government should nationalize it all in what would probably be the largest gold theft in history!

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5. Gandhi was not always the peaceful man he is well-known for being – in fact, he was never a pure pacifist in that he allowed for violence as a last resort. In his middle ages he volunteered to fight in three wars: The Boer War, The Zulu War, and World War I. Furthermore, after an attack by Muslims on Hindus he approved of the government’s order to shoot ten Muslims for every Hindu that was killed. In a famous statement about independence, Gandhi said: “If a fight is inevitable I would expect every son of the soil to contribute his mite… I would not flinch from sacrificing a million lives for India’s liberty.” [Source]

Interesting Fact: During the freedom struggle, he wore nothing but a loin cloth, but for years he lived in London and used to wear a silk hat and spats and carried a cane (as seen above).

 

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Did You Know – 10/20/2015

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1. 1.8 million cases of type 2 diabetes Americans could be prevented by 2020 if we did one simple thing. Stop drinking sugary drinks. Especially soda. Even for a lean healthy person one sugary drink a day increased risk of diabetes by 18% over 10 years according to a study in the BMJ. 

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2.That cinnamon has been found to be a great arsenal for shutting down the flu. Microbiologist Milton Schiffenbauer led a study that showed only cinnamon inactivated the virus Phi X 174 99.9 to 100% of the time in minutes. While this virus does not affect humans it is similar the viruses we do encounter like nasty colds, flu and even herpes. He suggests a tablespoon of cinnamon a day. Sounds good but I am thinking start off small, maybe a pinch in your coffee or a teaspoon in your smoothie, sprinkled on toast or muffin and maybe over dessert.

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3.You can induce sex dreams by your sleep position; A study published in Dreaming found that people who slept face down on their stomach with their arms stretched above their head had more sexual dreams—including ones about affairs with celebrities

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4.  Socks might be the weird key to your orgasm –  According to a Dutch study :  While measuring orgasms, they found that many of their female participants were uncomfortable due to cold feet. After they gave them socks, the percentage of those reaching orgasm rose from 50 to 80 percent.

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5. More wool comes from the state of Texas than any other state in the United States.

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6. Time passes faster for your face than for your feet (assuming you’re standing up). Einstein’s theory of relativity dictates that the closer you are to the centre of the Earth, the slower time goes – and this has been measured. At the top of Mount Everest, a year would be about 15 microsecond shorter than at sea level.

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7. When Mahatma Gandhi once went to meet the King of Britain in a simple loincloth, a reporter asked him if he felt underdressed. Gandhi replied, “The King wears enough clothes for both of us.

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Did you know – 11/26/2012

1. Hugging for 20 seconds releases Oxytocin, which can make someone trust you more

Source and more interesting information

2.  Astronauts have a patch of Velcro inside their helmets so they can scratch their nose.

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3.  In the 1800’s it was considered cruel and unusual punishment to feed prisoners lobster. It was like making people eat rats

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4.  Gandhi used to sleep naked next to young indian girls in order to test his resolve to chastity.

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5. Since 1945  all British Tanks have come equipped with tea making facilities

Every British tank since the centurion and most other British AFVs, Challenger 2 contains a boiling vessel (BV) also known as a kettle or bivvie for water which can be used to brew tea produce other hot beverages and heat boil-in-the-bag meals contained in  ration packs This BV requirement is general for armoured vehicles of the British Armed Forces, and is unique to the armed forces of the UK.

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