Tag Archives: conventional

Did You Know – 04/22/2019

 

  1. When you hang Eucalyptus in the shower the steam from the hot shower releases its oil which relies headache, reduces stress, eases muscle soreness and decongests the nasal passages.

 

2.  Difference between a conventional (caged chicken) egg and a pasture raised egg.

 

 

3.

 

A study done in Australia and published in the Australian Women’sWeekly, regarding women and alcohol say that:- 13.7% of women over 50 drink alcohol daily (thats me). 43.1 % of women say they drink at least weekly. 9.5% of women of all ages drink daily. I guess approximately 33.7% do not drink at all.

4.

GreenPaws Flea and Tick Products Directory is an excellent resource to gauge the safety of your pet’s products (and to find safer alternatives). If y0u go to this site and put in the product you intend to use on your animal it will assist  if possible to inform you of its toxicity. It has been disclosed in research that poisons in tick collars can also poison children and adults. Especially children when playing with their pets so it is important to make sure you are using a less harmful tick and flea collar.

 

5.  A Pescatarian is a person who is “one whose diet includes fish but no other meat.” It also includes fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, healthy fats Who knew – not me

 

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Biodynamic – The Real Deal

Have you ever wondered what Biodynamic farming is all about?
Well I had the privilege to actually go to one of their farms years ago. Found it absolutely fascinating. It is a real commitment to very healthy and pure food and farming.

So if you see the name on any products you can be assured that they are the best and purest food you can buy.
I found this article in the “Health and Nature” magazine and if you are interested in good nutritious food it is worth reading.
These type of farms are all over the world not just Australia

 

 

What does being a biodynamic farmer mean? It means that we provide the best possible value in our dairy products for our customers. It also means that we care for the environment in the best possible way. We do not pollute waterways, and we farm with the least water usage and waste possible. We care for our animals in the best possible way – for example, leaving calves with cows as long as they drink milk; not using anything artificial in animal husbandry, and running a bull with the herd to avoid artificial insemination; and by not using hormones, antibiotics, or chemical drenches. We use preventive methods, like herbal creams for udders to prevent mastitis,  herbal and mineral-based products in drinking water to prevent infections or parasites. We use biodynamic preparations made from herbs, manure and minerals on the soil, which provide nutrients that soil microorganisms need to be balanced, so that plants growing in that soil will be healthy and fertile. We try to keep a natural balance between native vegetation and crops to feed the cows. We run monthly study and discussion groups for interested farmers or home gardeners, and two-day workshops where people can learn to make the homeopathic preparations. For us, biodynamic farming is the only sustainable way of farming. Biodynamic farming means our kids can experience chemical-free farm life and grow up in a natural environment with friendly, happy animals.

How does biodynamic farming compare with conventional farming? It is similar to organic farming, in that both farming styles do not use chemicals, do not plant genetically modified crops, and follow strict rules as to how animals are treated, and what with. The difference is that in organic farming, one can take a fairly conventional approach, for example, if there is a weed problem they can use a spray or other method to get rid of the ‘problem’. In biodynamic farming, we instead regard this ‘problem’ as an indicator of where there is an imbalance. We then use natural methods, like weed teas made with herbal concentrates, to restore balance in the environment so that the problem becomes minor and eventually disappears. The same applies with treatments for the animals: we try to prevent problems by providing balanced feed rather than boosting milk production with a higher protein intake. In biodynamics, the long-term goal is healthy, long-living cows, which bear healthy calves without problems, and provide average, balanced production of unhomogenized milk. There is evidence from Europe that continuous consumption of homogenized milk is liked to heart disease; it may also lead to intolerances, as the body has difficulty dealing with proteins that can’t be digested and attempts to reject the unwanted fat molecules.

What is the one thing you want our readers to hear? Support local farmers to the best of your ability – this keeps our food chain alive, keeps Australian food being produced in Australia, and prevents productive land from being destroyed. Companies like ours need consumer support at the cash register. If supermarkets are made to understand that if products like ours are taken off the shelves and replaced with cheap imports or home-brand products that they will not be purchased, they will take notice! Vote with your dollar, and use the complaint pages on supermarket websites to have your say.
Find out more at www.bdfarmpariscreek.com.au

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A Legal Natural Burial Right – Green Burial

 

Found this article on Dr Axe’s site and found it really interesting so thought you may also. Suzanne Kelly has written a book on the subject that you also may like to read called  “Greening Death,”

Fear of the decomposing corpse reached a fever pitch, and cities and towns passed laws banning human burials within their borders. This marked the beginning of sanitizing death and the beginning of a funeral industry that today rakes in $16 billion annually in the U.S. alone. But we’re starting to see a backlash to these modern-day burial methods as the idea of green burial is gaining momentum in the United States once again.

What is a green burial service?

Also known as “natural burial,” the Green Burial Council describes a green burial as something that.

  • Impacts the environment minimally while caring for the dead
  • Conserves natural resources
  • Limits carbon emissions
  • Protects workers’ health
  • Promotes the restoration or preservation of habitat

Basically it is returning the body back to the earth in its natural form to decompose naturally with bugs and all that stuff.

The main features of today’s green burials include using:

  • No toxic chemicals, including embalming fluid
  • Biodegradable caskets
  • Biodegradable shrouds or urns
  • Minimizing the use of fossil fuels for burial

The Green Burial Council differ in their requirements for some areas so check it out and make sure a potential site matches your wants and needs. (For instance, some are certified to remain a preserve in perpetuity, while others aren’t.)

  • Hybrid. These burial sites are generally conventional cemeteries that offer a “green” section, allowing for the burial of umembalmed bodies in biodegradable caskets or shrouds. The cemetery may still allow the use of pesticides, turf lawn and non-native plants.
  • Natural burial grounds. Only unembalmed bodies are buried at these sites. Toxic chemicals, cement and metal vaults, traditional marble/stone grave markets and caskets made of non-biodegradable materials are banned. These burial sites also implement waste-reducing and energy-conserving guidelines to improve sustainability.
  • Conservation burial sites. This is the gold standard green burial if you’re looking to support land conservation. These burial grounds require an independent conservation group, like a land trust, to oversee the land. This ensures it will remain as a conservation easement or land permanently preserved in its natural state.

Is it legal to have a natural burial?

  • Yes, but not all cemeteries offer this option.
  • Kinkaraco, a green funeral products company, keeps a state-by-state list of green cemeteries that do not require embalming, a grave liner or vault.
  • Or course, lobbying your local cemetery to open a green section for natural burials is also an option to bring green services to your community.
  • Check your state and local laws to see if you can create an area of your property to be zoned as a  “home cemetery.” The rules and requirements may differ depending on how many people you may want to bury on your family’s land … and the acreage of your plot of land. And you will likely need to register coordinates of buried bodies with local officials. (7)
  • If you plan a burial on your private property, be sure to check state and local laws regarding who may fill out a death certificate and file it with the local registrar.
  • If opting for a home funeral, you can choose to work with a home funeral-friendly funeral home to help prepare the body or you and family members can prepare the body with gentle soap and essential oils. Look for a home funeral guide from your state to help direct you through the legalities and options available.

Are coffins biodegradable?

  • If you’re opting for a green burial, you’ll want to bypass coffin options offered in most conventional funeral homes.
  • Natural burials commonly use a natural fiber bed sheet, biodegradable shroud, a pine, seagrass or wicker box, natural papier-mâché or even a cardboard box. The general idea is that it’s natural, untreated wood or organic fiber. That way, it’ll break down and enhance the soil, not harm it.
  • You’ll want to avoid any stains, varnishes, paints or other finishes because they likely contain harmful chemicals. Stick to untreated.
  • Many green burial sites also allow loved ones to bury cremated remains.
  • Ashes after a cremation are inorganic bone fragments. You can grow a tree over the ashes, but they aren’t actually feeding the tree or soil.

Click here To find out more on this subject 

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Girl Talk

organic

I read this article in the ‘Australian Nature and Health‘ magazine, which incidentally is one of the best magazines of its genre.

The article was about Tampons. It made sense, and I have never thought of it before. I have never questioned the material that tampons are made of. The chemicals that are used in the product and how they are manufactured. Now I do.

It then led me to the question of what diseases could this cause. Could it be the cause of some of the cancers that seems to be on the increase in our young girls and older women in our reproductive areas like the ovaries, cervical  area, and Uterus even maybe breast cancer.

Anyway here is the article and I believe that after you have read this you maybe thinking ‘Organic’ in the future.

_hz

Change Your Tampon

“The average woman uses  12,000 tampons over a lifetime and it’s not just about what we put inside us that matters: It’s about where it’s coming from and where it ends up” warns Aimee Marks founder of TOM Organics.

“Conventional cotton is one of the world’s most heavily sprayed crops and these chemicals end up in the air, our waterways, our bodies and eventually landfill. Many tampons are made from rayon and plastic, the production of which involves labour intensive chemical processes and results in a product which takes a lot longer to break down than cotton. Organic tampons and pads are free from chemicals, bleaches and  also are biodegradable. She suggested to stop using plastic tampon applicators hundreds of thousands of them end up in our waterways every year and never flush sanitary products down the toilet.

_hz

This makes sense to me.

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