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Did You Know – 09/18/2018

An acre of hemp produces more paper than an acre of trees. Paper made from hemp lasts for centuries, compared to 25-80 years for paper made from wood pulp. The US Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper.

 

2. 10 Good uses for salt –

1. Deter ants
Sprinkle salt in doorways, on window sills and anywhere else ants use to sneak into your house. It’s a sure way to keep them out!

2. Kill grass and weeds growing in cracks in your driveway
Tired of weeding your driveway? Sprinkle salt on the grass and pour very hot water over it. Not only is this a highly effective way to kill unwanted plants, it’s also eco-friendly and cheap.

3. Say goodbye to fleas
If your dogs have fleas, simply wash their doghouse and blankets in salt water. If you’re worried your dogs may have brought fleas into your house, simply sprinkle your carpets lightly with salt and then brush it in. Leave it for 12 hours and vacuum thoroughly.

4. Pick up a dropped egg
If you drop an egg on the kitchen floor, sprinkle salt on the mess and leave it there for 20 minutes. You’ll be able to wipe it right up.

5. Clean up oven spills quickly
If a pie or casserole bubbles over in the oven, pour a handful of salt on top of the spill. It won’t smoke, smell and, most importantly, will bake into a crust that makes the mess easier to clean once it’s cooled.

6. Clean brown spots off your iron
Simply sprinkle salt on a sheet of waxed paper, slide the iron across it and rub lightly with silver polish. Your iron will look like brand-new in no time.

7. Remove stains from your coffee pot
Fill it with 1/4 cup of table salt and a dozen ice cubes. Swish the mixture around, let it sit for half an hour, fill it with cold water and rinse. Your coffee pot will look brand new.

8. Keep your windshield frost-free
Dip a sponge into salt water and rub it on windows, and they won’t frost up even when the mercury drops below zero.

9. Shell nuts more easily
Soak pecans and walnuts in salt water for a few hours before shelling them. Doing so will make it easier to remove the meat.

10. Drip-proof candles
If you soak new candles in a strong salt solution for a few hours, then dry them well, they won’t drip when you burn them.

And some more uses

11. Tame a wild BBQ
Toss a bit of salt on the flames caused by fat dripping from the grill. It’ll reduce the flames and calm the smoke without cooling the coals (like water would).

12. Soothe a bee sting
Wet the sting right away, then cover it with salt.

13. Stop a grease fire
Pouring salt on top of a grease fire will smother it. Completely.

14. Cooking tip
If a soup or stew is too sweet, add a pinch of salt.

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3. Aspirin discovered during experimentation –

Bayer died on May 6, 1880, while the company was still in the fabric dye business. The company went on to employ chemists to come up with innovative dyes and products and in 1897 that’s exactly what one of the chemists, Felix Hoffmann, did.

While experimenting with a waste product of one of the dye components to find relieve for his father’s rheumatism, Hoffmann chemically synthesised a stable form of salicylic acid powder. The compound became the active ingredient in a pharmaceutical wonder product: Aspirin.

Source

 

4.  In Texas, two categories of men are exempt from peeping tom charges: men over 50 and men with only one eye.

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5. Can’t remember if an egg is fresh or hard-boiled? Just spin the egg. If it wobbles, it’s raw. If it spins easily, it’s hard boiled.

eggsA fresh egg will sink in water, a stale one will float.

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Did You Know – 04/11/2016

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1.. The Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida is the world’s fourth largest building by volume. Completed in 1966, the VAB also holds the record of the largest one-story building in the world and the tallest building outside an urban center in the United States.
The VAB is so large, in fact, that it has its own weather. On humid days, rain clouds can form below the ceiling, requiring about 10,000 tons of air conditioning equipment to control the moisture. With this setup, the total volume of air in the building can be replaced in only one hour.
Source and more information

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2. When a male bee climaxes, their testicles explode then they die.
Strange as it is, this actually makes evolutionary sense: the snapped-off penis acts as a genital plug to prevent other drones from fertilizing the queen. Isn’t nature amazing!
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3. The blue whale is a massive creature and is the largest living animal in the world; even larger than most dinosaurs.
The largest of the blue whales can measure in at over 100 ft in length and can weigh in excess of 180 tons at its largest.
In fact everything about the blue whale is large including its, arteries and its heart.
On average most blue whales grow to be around 70 – 90 ft in length, weigh around 100 – 150 tons.
In order to get blood through the blue whales large body it has massive arteries, which pump blood through the heart and into its major vital organs.
The arteries are so large in fact that a full size human could swim through them.
The aorta alone measures in at over 9 inches!
The blue whales heart can weigh in excess of 1,300 lbs.
In terms of size the blue whales heart is about the size of a small car.
At a rate of 8 – 10 beats per minute the blue whale’s heartbeat can be heard from over 2 miles away.
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4. Hydrogen is a light, odorless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.
Interesting concept: – Edward R. Harrison, a cosmologist at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He writes in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society that yes, our universe may well have been created by intelligent beings in another universe. That assertion does nothing to explain how the whole thing began. It just moves the question back a step: Where did the universe inhabited by those intelligent beings come from? But Harrison’s idea would explain some very strange things about our universe, such as how exactly right for life it is.

The history of the Universe has been summed up thusly: “Hydrogen is a light, odorless gas, which, given enough time, turns into people.” When our universe began, it consisted mostly of hydrogen. That gas condensed into galaxies of stars, in whose cores heat and pressure fused atoms into heavier elements, including those necessary for life. Some of those stars exploded, spewing the heavier elements out into space. New stars and planets formed, including our own. On one of those planets, life appeared. Harrison contends that none of it could have happened unless all the physical constants (the speed of light, the charge and mass of the electron, and similar numbers) were just right. Reviewing the work of a long line of cosmologists, Harrison sums up what has come to be known as the Anthropic Principle: the Universe is the way it is because we exist. He explains: “In a universe containing luminous stars and chemical elements essential for the existence of organic life, the physical constants are necessarily precisely adjusted (or finely tuned). Slight deviations from the observed values could result in a starless and lifeless universe.”
More information for those interested

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5. Humans rode bareback or mounted horses with a simple blanket after they first domesticated the animals, thousands of years after the dawn of agriculture. The leather saddle first straddled a horse’s back in China perhaps as far back as the third century B.C. But the saddle was only one step toward transforming the use of cavalry as a means of waging war. Climbing onto a horse while bearing weapons had long presented its own precarious hazards. Cambyses II, a Persian king in the sixth century B.C., died after stabbing himself as he vaulted onto a horse.
The stirrup – such an important innovation was that it allowed the rider immensely greater control in horsemanship: rider and animal became almost extensions of each other. It was possible to shoot arrows accurately while the horse dashed ahead at full gallop. A cavalryman could brace himself in the saddle and, with a lance positioned under his arm, use the tremendous force of the charging horse to strike a stunned enemy. The horse’s sheer mass and quickness became an implement of the cavalry’s weaponry—and a powerful intimidation factor.
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Did You Know – 07/21/2015

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1. A bee sting is acidic and a wasp sting is Alkali. To treat a sting by one of these you should use the opposite type of chemical. Bee stings needs to be neutralised with sodium bicarbonate and wasp stings are alkaline and can be treated with vinegar!

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2. The evergreen tree family includes mango, pistachio, cashew, and poison ivy.

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3. Apart from humans the animal most likely to suffer from leprosy is the armadillo

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4. The original flight by Wilbur Wright in 1903 was 75ft shorter than the wingspan of a Boeing 747.

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5. On July 7, 1928, sliced bread was first put on sale to the public by the by the Chillicothe Baking Company of Chillicothe, Missouri, USA.


In 1943, the US imposed a ban on sliced bread as a wartime conservation measure. The ban was rescinded after only seven weeks.


The Ancient Egyptians used to pay workers in bread and beer but the use of “dough” in English as slang for “money” dates back only to 1851.

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6.Threefold coincidence relating to apples

On June 29, 1975, Steve Wozniak tested the first working prototype of his Apple I computer.

On June 29, 2007, Apple Inc released the iPhone, their first mobile phone.

June 29, 2015, sees the first night of a new production of Rossini’s apple-related opera William Tell at the Royal Opera House.

Also
Research in 2005 reported that mice fed concentrated apple juice perform better in mazes.

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Did You Know – 10/29/2012

1.You can figure out which way is south if you are near a tree stump. the growth rings are wider on the south side. Growth is more lush on the side of the tree facing the south in the Northern Hemisphere and vice versa in the Southern Hemisphere. Growth is more vigorous on the side toward the equator and the tree growth rings will be more widely spaced.
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2. The shortest war on record was fought between Zanzibar (now part of Tanzania) and England in 1896. Zanzibar surrendered after 38 minutes.
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3. A Cockroach can live for 4 weeks with no head (Interesting but Gross). Their necks would seal off just by clotting. The hardy vermin breathes through spiracles, or little holes in each body segment.
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4. A bee sting is acidic and a wasp sting is alkali. To treat a sting by one of these you should use the opposite type of chemical. Suggested for bee’s deodorant or calamine lotion. Bicarbonate of soda for wasps.
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5. Each time lightning strikes, some Ozone gas is produced, thus strengthening the Ozone Layer in the Earth’s atmosphere. The lightning bolt is 3 times hotter than the sun.
Source


6. A mule is a cross between a male donkey and a female horse. A Hinny is a cross between a male horse and a female donkey. A Zonkey or Zeedonk is a zebra/donkey cross.

Source

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Did You Know – 03/15/2012

It takes 12 bees their entire lifetime to make a tablespoon of honey.

Honey has been used both as a centre for golf balls and in antifreeze mixtures


A group of owls is called a parliament.


Due to gravitational effects you weigh slightly less when the moon is directly overhead

Most Tigers have more than 100 stripes, and no two tigers have the same stripes. One averaged sized tiger can eat up to 60 pounds of meat at a single time

Rain drops can fall at a speed of about 22 miles an hour. It starts off as Ice or snow crystals at cloud level. Rain drops range in size from 0.02 inches to about 031 inches

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Did You Know « 02/22/2011

That Lemon wood is carved into chess pieces. « Over a century ago Chess pieces, traditionally were made of boxwood. When carved and polished the product was rich and close-grained, a delight to the eye and sensuous to the hand. The Queen in Tenniel’s illustration of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice” is a Staunton piece.
Orange or lemon wood is substituted for boxwood and soon the truth of the old saying is proved once more: “Nobody has yet made anything that some one else cannot make cheaper and poorer.”
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The first country to use postcards was Austria Source

Pearls dissolve in vinegar.« A pearl is mostly calcium carbonate, which is susceptible to even a weak acid solution. The crystals of calcium carbonate are converted by acetic acid (vinegar) into calcium, which dissolves in the residual water, and carbonate that effervesces as bubbles of carbon dioxide, the formula for which is CaCO3 + CH3COOH –> Ca + H2O + CO2.
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A queen bee can lay 800 – 1500 eggs per day « Source


The first jukebox was located in San Francisco in 1899 « On November 23 1899 the world’s first jukebox went public at the Palais Royal Hotel in San Francisco.
In it’s first 6 month it earned about $1000.00. That’s a lot of nickels. Source

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