Did You Know – 12/14/2015


1. Hot buttered rum 420 calories

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INGREDIENTS

  • 4 ounces (1 stick) room-temperature unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup packed dark-brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 ounces dark rum
  • 3/4 cups boiling water
  • Squeeze of Fresh orange juice

DIRECTIONS

  1. Beat butter, sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg with a mixer on medium speed until combined, about 1 minute.

  2. Combine 2 tablespoons spiced butter with 1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) dark rum in each of 4 heatproof glasses. Pour 3/4 cup boiling water over each, and stir. Top each with a squeeze of fresh orange juice.

  2.  Eggnog before the brandy – 240 calories

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Ingredients
4 egg yolks
1/3 cup sugar, plus 1 tablespoon
1 pint whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
3 ounces bourbon
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
4 egg whites*
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Directions
Watch how to make this recipe.
In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Add the milk, cream, bourbon and nutmeg and stir to combine.

Place the egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat to soft peaks. With the mixer still running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form.

Whisk the egg whites into the mixture. Chill and serve.

Cook’s Note: For cooked eggnog, follow procedure below.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the egg yolks until they lighten in color. Gradually add the 1/3 cup sugar and continue to beat until it is completely dissolved. Set aside.

In a medium saucepan, over high heat, combine the milk, heavy cream and nutmeg and bring just to a boil, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and gradually temper the hot mixture into the egg and sugar mixture. Then return everything to the pot and cook until the mixture reaches 160 degrees F. Remove from the heat, stir in the bourbon, pour into a medium mixing bowl, and set in the refrigerator to chill.

In a medium mixing bowl, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. With the mixer running gradually add the 1 tablespoon of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Whisk the egg whites into the chilled mixture.

CONTAINS RAW EGGS: The Food Network Kitchen suggest caution in consuming raw and lightly cooked eggs due to the slight risk of salmonella or other food-borne illness. To reduce this risk, we recommend you use only fresh, properly refrigerated, clean grade A or AA eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the shell. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or undercooked when the dish is served, use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method.
Recipe courtesy of Alton Brown, 2005

3.  One glass of Champagne – 40z – 85 calores

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Easy no recipe and I guess champagne wins on the calorie count.

 

5.  More Did You Knows and an important one.

onlinePrivacy

5 Ways to Protect Your Digital Privacy 
By Mark Nestmann

Revelations about clandestine data collection are old news now. Government agencies and thousands of commercial entities are able to access our personal information via the internet and by mining public databases. 

Data that you thought was removed and files you thought you deleted can still be recovered from your personal computer. And all computers are vulnerable to this. 

But luckily there are steps we can take to maintain some level of privacy in a non-private world. You can mask your digital presence. It doesn’t cost much, and it’s fairly easy even for the tech-unsavvy amongst us.

Here are some simple and effective ways to protect your digital privacy. 

  1. Secure your router. If you have a high-speed internet connection in your home, it probably connects to the internet through a device called a router. Routers are usually installed with a default password. Should someone take over your router, it’s relatively easy to change the settings to point to a computer controlled by that person. From that point forward, everything you do online can be monitored. So change the password on your router to one that can’t easily be guessed. 
  1. Configure your internet browser for privacy. As you surf the Web, you pick up a trail of temporary files that your browser stores, sometimes indefinitely. To minimize your digital trail, use the private browsing mode of your internet browser. This turns off all tracking features including browsing history, auto-complete, form and search bar entries, passwords, and download list entries. In addition, no cookies or web cache files are stored.
  1. Use a non-U.S. webmail provider. Webmail—services like Yahoo mail and Gmail—is extremely convenient. You can access your emails from anywhere and a virtually unlimited number of messages for free. But with U.S.-based webmail services, you can kiss your privacy goodbye. The police can legally read older emails (anything more than 180 days old) and Gmail, Yahoo, and other domestic email providers receive tens of thousands of subpoenas from police and other government agencies.

    To protect yourself, use a non-U.S. email service that takes privacy and security seriously. The one we use at The Nestmann Group is Century Media. This company offers end-to-end encrypted email and all its servers are based in Switzerland. That means your stored emails are secure from U.S. subpoenas, court orders, and snoops.
  1. Encrypt your emails, messages, and files. With an encryption program, no one but you and your intended recipient can read your email messages, text messages, and instant messages. The technology scrambles the message and a decryption key is needed to read the message. Some encryption programs available now make it nearly impossible to decipher your messages, even by the supercomputers used by the NSA.
  1. Encrypt your cloud storage. Storing data online, whether it’s email messages or the secret formula to Coca-Cola “in the cloud” is now routine. But like everything else, if you’re dealing with a U.S. company, it’s not necessarily private or secure. Take U.S.-based Dropbox, for example. Not only is Dropbox subject to extremely loose U.S. privacy laws, but researchers discovered that private Dropbox files you share can be indexed by search engines, making it possible for anyone who can find the link to open it.

    One way to protect yourself is to upload only encrypted files to Dropbox. Otherwise, consider one of the many Dropbox alternatives such as Tresorit.

 Source Interesting Website –  Mark Nestmann

 

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