Tag Archives: dollar

Did You Know – 01/04/2016

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  1. The Origins of engineering specs and government decisions.Ever wonder where engineering specifications come from? The US standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) is 4 feet, 8.5 inches, an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that’s the way they built them in England, and the English built the first US railroads. 

    Why did the English build them like that? Because the first rail lines were built by the people who built the pre-railroad tramways, and that is the gauge they used. 

    Why did they use that particular gauge then? Because the people who built the tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building wagons, which used the same wheel spacing. 

    Okay! Why did the wagons have that particular odd wheel spacing? 

    Well, if they tried to use any other spacing, the wagon wheels would break on the old, long distance roads in England, because that’s the spacing of the wheel ruts in the granite sets. 

    So, who built those old rutted roads? Imperial Rome built the first long distance roads in Europe (and England) for their legions. The roads have been used ever since. 

    And the ruts in the roads? Roman war chariots formed the initial ruts, which everyone else chose to match for fear of destroying their wagon wheels. Since the chariots were made for (or by) Imperial Rome, they all had the same wheel spacing. 

    The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches is derived from the specification for an Imperial Roman war chariot. 

    Specifications and Bureaucracies live forever. The Imperial man of war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war-horses. 

    Now let’s cut to the present… 

    The Space Shuttle, sitting on its launch pad, has two booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank. These are solid rocket boosters, or SRB’s. Thiokol builds SRB’s at its factory in Utah. The engineers who designed the SRB’s wanted to make them a bit fatter, but the SRB’s had to be shipped by train from the factory to the launch site. 

    The railroad line from the factory has to run through a tunnel in the mountains. The SRB’s had to fit through that tunnel, which is slightly wider than the railroad track, and the railroad track is about as wide as two horses’ behinds. 

    So…. a major design feature of what is arguably the world’s most advanced transportation system was determined two thousand years ago by a horse’s ass. 

    Which is pretty much how most government decisions are still made today.

2. What plug to look for :-

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3.  Almost no one uses real tin foil these days. The stuff we all call “tin foil” is actually aluminium foil. Originally foil was made of tin but it gave (not surprisingly) a tin flavor to whatever it touched. It was heavier than modern aluminium foil, which has its benefits but not enough to keep it going strong in our kitchens. Aluminium foil began to surpass tin foil after World War II but it had been available since 1910 when it was first produced by “Dr. Lauber, Neher & Cie.” a Swiss company using the force of a waterfall to drive the foil making machinery. Its first use in the US was as a wrapper on Life Savers candy in 1913.

Interesting Fact: Tin foil was used to fill cavities in teeth before the 20th century. Gross because have you ever  had Aluminum foil touch your teeth?

source

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4. That most of the gold held in reserve in the United States of America is stored at Fort Knox right? Actually, it isn’t. In reality, most of the gold in the US is stored at the Federal Reserve Vault at Wall Street in New York. Another interesting fact is that most of that gold doesn’t even belong to the US – it belongs to foreign accounts! Given the state of the US dollar at the moment maybe the US government should nationalize it all in what would probably be the largest gold theft in history!

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5. Gandhi was not always the peaceful man he is well-known for being – in fact, he was never a pure pacifist in that he allowed for violence as a last resort. In his middle ages he volunteered to fight in three wars: The Boer War, The Zulu War, and World War I. Furthermore, after an attack by Muslims on Hindus he approved of the government’s order to shoot ten Muslims for every Hindu that was killed. In a famous statement about independence, Gandhi said: “If a fight is inevitable I would expect every son of the soil to contribute his mite… I would not flinch from sacrificing a million lives for India’s liberty.” [Source]

Interesting Fact: During the freedom struggle, he wore nothing but a loin cloth, but for years he lived in London and used to wear a silk hat and spats and carried a cane (as seen above).

 

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Saving Tip For Today – 09/29/2015 – How is your Seal?

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Test for a tight seal on you refrigerator by closing the door on a dollar bill: If you can easily pull the dollar out the seal will need replacing. Hence will save you heaps of dollars as a faulty seal on your refrigerator or freezer. You will be amazed how much you will save in one year.

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Todays Money Tip

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Free Money

An individual development account or IDA, allows low – to – moderate income earners to save money for a specific goal-such as a down payment on a house or starting a business and get matching funds from non profit groups, corporations and government agencies. 

Many IDA’s provide a dollar for dollar match.

Visit IDAnetwork.org – To learn more 

This of course is only available to those in USA

Source

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Saving Tip For Today

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Convert your cash into $50 bills. Believe me you will think twice before spending them

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Want to Travel To Europe?

Unfortunately the US dollar is in poor shape at the moment which makes traveling to Europe rather expensive.

Well here is some good news. The Cruise companies in their wisdom, predicted that Europe was going to be a gold mine as far as tourism goes. Alas it was not to be, but good news for us, because there is now a glut of cabins on cruise ships that are going for a bargain.

  • Major Cruise lines increased the European capacity but it has not been as popular as predicted and cabins are not selling.
  • The Companies are offering discount prices for Spring and Summer.
  • Packages can include airfares at a price much lower than we can buy them.
  • You can use your frequent flyer point as well.
This means you can pay for most of your trip here in the States using your US dollar.
So if you were planning to go to Europe for the summer, don’t let the low US dollar scare you off as you can pay for most of it at home.
Happy Holidaying!

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Life and Death of a U.S. Dollar Bill

Nothing gets around more than your average dollar bill!
Here are some interesting facts on the typical life span each one holds.

Via: Online Finance Degree

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Did You Know « 9/20/2010

August is baby month

August, the month with the highest birth rate. 19.5% of new August babies are born in India and 11.6% in China.
About 51% of all babies born in the US are boys; 49% are girls.
More babies are born on Tuesdays and Wednesdays than any other day, with Sundays delivering the fewest babies. And compared with other months, the stork flies least in February.

SOURCE: BabyCenter, CIA World Fact Book, National Center for Health, Population Reference Bureau

Bananas

Bananas are the world’s most popular fruit after tomatoes. In western countries, they could account for 3% of a grocer’s total sales. Bananas consistently are the number one compliant of grocery shoppers. Most people complain when bananas are overripe or even freckled. The fact is that spotted bananas are sweeter

Labor Day in the USA

Celebrated annually as a public holiday on the first Monday in September, Labor Day signifies the end of summer for many in the USA. The first Labor Day, however, was held on a Tuesday in 1882. In “pursuit of happiness” through shorter hours and higher pay, printers were the first to go on a strike.

The origin of the dollar

A mining hole in the mountains of Bohemia produced so much silver it became the official source of coinage for the entire Holy Roman Empire. The mine was in a valley called Joachimsthal, and the coins came to have the same name: “Joachimstalers.” Over time this became shortened to “Talers” and over more time, the American pronunciation of the word became the name for the currency that you would like to have in your pocket.

The $ sign was designed in 1788 by Oliver Pollock, a New Orleans businessman, using a combination of Spanish money symbols.

Bank of America started as Bank of Italy

Amedeo Giannini, son of Italian immigrants to the US, started the Bank of Italy in a converted saloon in San Francisco at 9 am on Monday, October 17, 1904. On the first day, 28 deposits totalled $8,780.

When an earthquake struck in 1907, he ran his bank from a plank in the street – the word “bank” is from the Italian “banca”, meaning a bench or counter. Word quickly spread about his service and by 1916 he had several branches. By 1929, the bank was strong enough to withstand the Great Depression stock crash. Giannini changed the name to Bank of America in 1928 and remained chairman until 1963.

SOURCE OF INFORMATION

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